PRICKLY SUBJECT: THE PINEAPPLE EXTRAVAGANZA





Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler

from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler



The pineapple has long been a symbol of hospitality in design and architecture and is still trending today. So what better way to start the new year with a token of welcome, friendliness and graciousness and a compilation of images celebrating the now universal exotic and prickly fruit.

A-Gent of Style started compiling images of pineapples represented in interior design about six months ago and this feature wouldn’t have been possible partly without the help of the treasure trove of inspiration that is Instagram, so a big thank-you first and foremost to all my follow Instagramers from whom some of these images are borrowed.



"Pineapple" wallpaper by Adelphi Paper Hangings

“Pineapple” wallpaper by Adelphi Paper Hangings

 

Lyford Cay Club, Tom Scherrer

Lyford Cay Club, by Tom Scheerer

 

Lyford Cay Club, by Tom Scheerer

Lyford Cay Club, by Tom Scheerer

 

Christopher Columbus discovered the pineapple, or ananas colossus, when he landed in Guadeloupe in 1493 and introduced it to the west on his return as “pine of the Indians”. This beautiful exotic fruit was given as a gift to promote hospitality and welcome. Pineapples were then extremely expensive (sugar and sweets were very uncommon) and were considered as a sign of prestige and affluence, first adorning homes and tables; much prized, the pineapple was often the centrepiece of table displays. In fact, people who could not afford to serve pineapples could rent them, use them as a centerpiece, and give them back after their banquet was over. By the 18th century, architects in Europe introduced the fruit in their work, carved in wood and stone, because of their novelty and value.

The Dunmore Pineapple, Scotland, a folly and summerhouse built for the fourth Earl of Dunmore in 1761 on the ground of Dunmore House, Scotland, featuring a 14 metre high carved stone pineapple on the top of the building.

The Dunmore Pineapple, Scotland, a folly and summerhouse built for the fourth Earl of Dunmore in 1761 on the ground of Dunmore House, Scotland, featuring a 14 metre high carved stone pineapple on the top of the building.

 

The pineapple folly at Dunmore Estate, Scotland

The pineapple folly at Dunmore Estate, Scotland

 

A seventeenth-century painting of King Charles II receiving the first pineapple ever to be grown in Britain from his gardener. The depiction of the scene is a reflection of just how important an event it was.

A seventeenth-century painting of King Charles II receiving from his gardener the first pineapple ever to be grown in Britain. The depiction of the scene is a reflection of just how important an event it was.



Today, we see pineapples not only on facades and on the framework of historical edifices such as stately homes, churches or government buildings, doorways but also on fabric, wallpaper, tableware, lighting, ornaments, furniture and accessories.

Pineapples – Not just one of your five a day…

 

'The Isis Chair' & 'Pineapple Frond' fabric by Soane Britain

 


2

from Irving & Morrison

from Irving & Morrison



Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.33.54

By Rifle Paper Co.

By Rifle Paper Co.

 

Chez Laura Slatkin, screenshot of video by Quintessence & with Susanna Salk

Chez Laura Slatkin, screenshot of video by Quintessence with Susanna Salk



An American painted tole chandelier, 1940s, from Ebury Trading

An American painted tole chandelier, 1940s, from Ebury Trading

 

via Paolo Moschino instagram

via Paolo Moschino instagram

 

Leaf wallpaper by Katie Ridder

Leaf wallpaper by Katie Ridder

 

by Philip Hewat Jaboor

by Philip Hewat-Jaboor

 

by Anthony Hail via Margaret Russell's instagram

by Anthony Hail via Margaret Russell’s instagram



via Michael Bargo instagram

via Michael Bargo instagram



via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram

 

from Brown Rigg antiques

from Brown Rigg antiques

 

Cressida Bell

fabric by Cressida Bell

 

Set of two metal table lamps with glass pineapple adornments from Joss & Main

Set of two metal table lamps with glass pineapple adornments from Joss & Main

 

Carolyne Roehm

Carolyne Roehm

 

Carolyne Roehm via Mark D Sikes instagram

Carolyne Roehm via Mark D Sikes instagram



via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram



Pineapple silk damask by De Gournay

Pineapple silk damask by De Gournay

 

De Gournay silk damask

De Gournay silk damask

 

via Pigotts Store instragram

via Pigotts Store instagram



Console table by Chelsea Textiles at Ham Yard Hotel

Console table by Chelsea Textiles at Ham Yard Hotel



Talbot Green Brocatelle. An original design by A W N Pugin taken from a set of vestments at Pugin's own church St Augustine's Ramsgate and rewoven for St Chad's Metropolitan Cathedral, Birmingham. Watts and Co. Church Fabric Supplier

Talbot Green Brocatelle. An original design by A W N Pugin represented by Watts & Co taken from a set of vestments at Pugin’s own church St Augustine’s Ramsgate and rewoven for St Chad’s Metropolitan Cathedral, Birmingham. Watts and Co. Church Fabric Supplier

 

by Cressida Bell

by Cressida Bell

 

Studio Printworks pineapple wallpaper or fabric

Studio Printworks Pineapple wallpaper or fabric

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.12.45 

The Rug Company

from The Rug Company

 

via Piggots Store instagram

via Piggots Store instagram

 

Chelsea Textiles

by Chelsea Textiles

 Julie Tinton

photograph by Julie Tinton

via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram



via Alessandra Branca instagram

Interior by and via Alessandra Branca instagram

 

 

Rose & Grey

Wisteria by Rose Tarlow

Wisteria by Rose Tarlow

 

sulia.com

PINEAPPLE WHITE PALM WG


Muriel Brandolini

by Muriel Brandolini

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.45.11


Tinto wools by Zoffany

Tinto wools by Zoffany

 

from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. A 1940s six branch tole chandelier in the form of a pineapple, French

from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. A 1940s six branch tole chandelier in the form of a pineapple, French





King's Head, Vanderhurd

King’s Head, fabric by Vanderhurd

 

from 1stDibs

from 1stDibs



 Julie Tinton

photograph by Julie Tinton

 

By Henri fitzwilliam lay, H&G Dec 2013

By Henri fitzwilliam lay, H&G Dec 2013

 

KRISHNAJI HOWLAJI ARA (1914-1985) UNTITLED (STILL LIFE); UNTITLED (BALLARD PIER)

by Krishna Howlaji Ara, Untitled (still life)

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.09.38

by smallable.com via madabouthehouse.com

by smallable.com via madabouthehouse.com




Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.10.57

via A Decorative Affair instagram

via adecorativeaffair instagram

 

Atelier d'Offard

fabric by Atelier d’Offard

 

Greg Kinsella

wallpaper by Greg Kinsella

 

Marie Helene de Taillac, NYC

Interior of Marie Helene de Taillac, NYC

 

The Pineapple Frond wallpaper by Soane Britain

The Pineapple Frond wallpaper by Soane Britain

 

Rose & Grey

by Rose & Grey

 

Nicky Haslam Design for OKA

Nicky Haslam Design for OKA

 

via Piggots Store instagram

via Piggots Store instagram

 

by House of Hackney

by House of Hackney

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.44.56

via A Decorative Affair instagram

via adecorativeaffair instagram

 

Abigail Ahern

by Abigail Ahern

 

Pineapple fabric - Waverly Fabric Collection: Island Life

Pineapple fabric – Waverly Fabric Collection: Island Life

 

Maison CHARLES -Pair of Pineapple Motif Table Lamps from 1stdibs.com |

Maison CHARLES -Pair of Pineapple Motif Table Lamps from 1stdibs.com

 

Dorothy Draper framed Pineapple fabric, panel signed from 1stdibs.com |

Dorothy Draper framed Pineapple fabric, panel signed from 1stdibs.com



via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram



Furnishing fabric, Pugin from the V&A

Furnishing fabric by Pugin from the V&A

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.44.44

from Paolo Moschino's Instagram

via paolomoschino instagram

 

chad-barrett-artist-s-pineapple_i-G-27-2753-4R7TD00Z

House of Hackney

by House of Hackney



Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) visited Queensland in 1920 on behalf of his father, King George V, to thank Australians for the part they had played in World War I. The banquet at Finney’s Cafe was gaily printed in the shape of a pineapple, and it is one of the earliest menus in the ‘royal visits’ collection.

Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) visited Queensland in 1920 on behalf of his father, King George V, to thank Australians for the part they had played in World War I. The banquet at Finney’s Cafe was gaily printed in the shape of a pineapple, and it is one of the earliest menus in the ‘royal visits’ collection.



Rose & Grey

by Rose & Grey

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 16.21.01


Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.03.53


Pentreath Hall

by Pentreath Hall

 

By Hannah Rampley

by Hannah Rampley

 

Staircase finial at Durham Castle

Staircase finial at Durham Castle

 

Little Greene

by Little Greene

 

Thornback & Peel

by Thornback & Peel

 

A German silver pineapple cup and cover, 1610, that belonged to Michael Inchbald. Christie's auction 2014

A German silver pineapple cup and cover, 1610, that belonged to Michael Inchbald. Christie’s auction 2014

 

 

By Timourous beasties

by Timourous Beasties

 

from www.Bungalow1a.com

from www.Bungalow1a.com

 

 

Mariette Himes Gomez. Architectural Digest

Interior by Mariette Himes Gomez. Architectural Digest

 

Veronese in raspberry & silvery gold, Fortuny

Veronese in raspberry & silvery gold, by Fortuny

 

Rocket St George

by Rockett St George



'Pineapple' by Studio Printworks

‘Pineapple’ by Studio Printworks

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.29.01


Male Fashion Trends: Michael Bastian Spring/Summer 2014

Male Fashion Trends: Michael Bastian Spring/Summer 2014



'The Pineapple Lamp' by Soane Britain

‘The Pineapple Lamp’ by Soane Britain



A-Gent of Style camouflaging amongst Pineapple by Adephi Paper Hangings

A-Gent of Style camouflaging amongst ‘Pineapple’ by Adephi Paper Hangings





 

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING AT: VOGUE WITH VOGUE





By now, some of you, loyal A-Gentees, will know how much deference and slight adoration A-Gent of Style feels toward Hamish Bowles – the uninitiated ones can find out for themselves here, here and here. A-Gent of Style was this close last week to meeting Vogue’s fabulous International Editor-at-Large at the heartfelt David Collins tribute and had just about mustered the courage to introduce himself…
until Mario Testino walked past him and trumped him. Le grand sigh.




But, A-Gent of Style found great solace and comfort the day after by coming across Vogue’s latest Original Shorts film featuring the English dandy Editrix himself
and ‘Girls’ rising star Lena Dunham.


Ranson_MandelaHamish_Bowles


In an atmospheric video called ‘Cover Girl’ posted by Vogue.com, the red-lipstick, silk pyjama-clad “Girls” star is portrayed as practising sexy poses in front of the mirror in preparation for the photo shoot of the Vogue’s February cover the following day.
Lena Dunham is a woman of many talents but modelling is not one of them. Consequently, she seeks the help of Monsieur Bowles on how to pose and pout.
The dapper fashionista sporting a tuxedo comes to the gauche comedian’s rescue and takes her through fifty years of iconic images showing legendary poses by models ranging from Kate Moss (“romantic, dreamy, ethereal”), Cindy Crawford (“crazy, athletic Amazon”), Veruschka (“hieroglyphs”) and Twiggy (“pigeon-toed, goofy”), which the pair dutifully perform to the soundtrack of a Jazz Age track
in the Rita Konig-esque Manhattan apartment decorated with a floral and lattice-shaped antique wallpaper by Second Hand Rose, a leopard print carpet by
ABC Carpet & Home and D.Porthault bucolic bed linen.

The result has great panache, style and fun. I hope you agree!


The final shot by renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz features the 27-year-old star trussed up in everything from Prada, Alexander McQueen, Céline and
Dolce & Gabbana, who chooses one particular wide-eyed expression to emulate for her cover photo. You will know by now who she Chanel-led.

'I think I'm starting to get the hang of this.'

‘I think I’m starting to get the hang of this.’



– Photos and video by Vogue –



THE ENCHANTING WORLD OF KLAUS HAAPANIEMI






Do some of these products look vaguely familiar to you?



If the answer is yes, it’s probably because you have seen in stores such as
John Lewis, the Conran Shop or Skandium the Taika and Satumetsä dinnerware made by Iittala – the Finnish design brand specialising in design objects, cookware and tableware.




These homeware ceramics were created by Finnish illustrator and artist
Klaus Haapaniemi whose designs are instantly recognisable through his phantasmagorical and whimsical imagery. Haapaniemi mixes his homeland folklore and Arts and Crafts, nature, paganism, fantasy, fairy tales and mysticism and instills his designs with his own quirky twist that conjures up a magical and ethereal world populated with wild animals, creatures and monsters.




Haapaniemi, who originally graduated as a graphic designer from the Lahti Institute of Design, Finland, has now become one of Britain’s most in-demand illustrators in advertising art, fashion and clothing fabric prints; his portfolio includes collaborations with Diesel, where he started as a print designer, then fashion label Bantam for which he moved to Italy to ultimately become their creative director and illustrator, and various projects with Levi’s, Cacharel, Marimekko, D&G, Iittala, Stella McCartney and Christian Louboutin.

He has also decorated the Christmas windows at Selfridges, drawn Christmas story-books with celebrity writers such as Madonna’s daughter Lourdes and David Hasselhoff. In 2008, he won the Graphic Designer of the Year award.









Project with Isetan Wonder Christmas 2012

Collaboration with Christian Louboutin


In November 2010, after moving to London, Haapaniemi launched a new home and fashion textiles brand called Klaus Haapaniemi together with the art director and concept designer Mia Wallenius – whom he met in Italy where she became senior art director at Gucci – under which he has designed his first signature collection including textile products in pure and luxurious materials combining traditional weaving techniques with modern prints and sophisticated colours.




He has now extended his brand to furniture, fashion, books, events and exhibitions and often work together with other designers and studios to create limited edition design pieces and bespoke commissions.



Collaboration with  Christian Louboutin

Collaboration with Christian Louboutin


A-Gent of Style
was delighted to hear that this summer Klaus Haapaniemi was opening his very first flagship shop in London. And what better location that Shoreditch’s Redchurch Street, the hip street that can boast Shoreditch House,
Conran’s The Boundary and Maison Trois Garçons as its residents and also the newly opened Lee Broom showroom, round the corner on Rivington Street.



Having two design-junkie friends living in the area, A-Gent of Style took the opportunity to visit the shop last week and was given a very warm welcome by Mia who very kindly took the time to help A-Gent with his research.




The showroom and shop showcase the whole brand’s products: scarves
(hand-printed silk, satin or fine wool), throws and shawls (lamb’s wool and silk), cushions (woven silk brocade, linen, embroidery, heavy woven tapestry or hand-printed) but also ceramics (cute cats or owls that can be used for storage or just decoratively), prints (beautiful silkscreens printed on coloured heavyweight papers and all signed as limited-edition) and some pieces of furniture such as upholstered, circular poufs.




Mia told me that, a few months ago, Haapaniemi launched a collection of rugs inspired this time by the summer and representing flowers, fruits, bees and pollination. Hand-dyed and made of tufted wool in Varanasi, India, the series of three designs feature the cosmic vortex and unity of the natural universe. The muted colour palette is inspired by earthy Nordic Arts & Crafts textile designs.




A-Gent of Style loved the simple, organic and elegant way the shop was designed: low-level, reeded joinery that skirts around the shop, gorgeous dark green/teal paint
(A-Gent’s favourite colour) and beautiful, delicate bobbin-shaped poles in natural timber on the shelves.








Isn't this whale adorable?

Isn’t this whale adorable?




This has got to be A-Gent's favourite item; love the colour and pattern

This has got to be A-Gent’s favourite item; love the colour and pattern





Gorgeous detail on the shelves that looks like a door plate and handle plate

Gorgeous detail on the shelves that looks like a door and handle plate








I love everything about this cushion pad: the shape, the blue and the contrast stitching

I love everything about this cushion pad: the shape, the colour and the contrast stitching

 

This rug is an incredible piece of craftmanship

 


 

Stunning piece of marble

Stunning piece of marble on the desk

 



A few gems hidden away in the office that Mia let A-Gent of Style see.

A great, big door handle made of wood

A great, big door handle made of wood

 

One of the walls upholstered in hand-woven silk fabric. Stunning

One of the walls upholstered in hand-woven silk fabric. Stunning

 

New rug

 

Another new rug design

 

This scuplted mural is made of brass and was used as the focal piece of a functioning bar designed for Design Week

This sculpted mural is laser cut copper and brass and was used as the focal piece for a functioning bar specially designed for London Design Week. Magical





A-Gent of Style was also let in on a secret: Klaus Haapaniemi will be launching soon a range of wallpaper. So stay tuned!




Next time you are in Shoreditch, make sure you stop by Klaus Haapaniemi and let yourself be enchanted. Or make a special trip there, you won’t be disappointed.

In the meanwhile, here’s Klaus Haapaniemi enchanting animation for Finding Wonder Christmas, Isetan, Japan.







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