PAD LONDON 2013





One of A-Gent of Style‘s favourite times of the year has arrived. And we are not talking birthdays or Christmas here. We are talking ‘PAD time’.





The Pavilion of Art and Design celebrates its 7th anniversary in London this year and returns to Berkeley Square to dazzle and inspire us once again
with the crème de la crème of objets from the world of 20th C and contemporary design, decorative art, photography and jewellery.




A roster of sixty highly respected galeristes and antique dealers from all around the world will showcase iconic and coveted pieces. A-Gent of Style is already looking forward to seeing the stunning signature room-like vignettes, created and curated by the exhibitors, that have now been inextricably associated with PAD.
Rather than looking like sterile showroom stands, theses decorative panoramas resemble apartments with astonishing combinations of wares interacting and living harmoniously next to each other. Eclecticism, authenticity and connoisseurship are key at the boutique fair where collectors, interiors specialists, design practitioners, art consultants, museum experts and the public gather to share their passion for the decorative arts.





There is an indisputable youthful, dynamic yet serious quality to the fair that makes PAD so special and inspiring. A-Gent of Style has his favourites but is also looking forward to discovering new and returning participants like
Gallery Matthieu Richard.

Will a Polar Bear be spotted this year at PAD?! All will be revealed this evening at the Collector’s Preview.


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Rózsavölgyi Csokoládé



 



Rózsavölgyi Csokoládé is a brilliant chocolate company based that was created in 2004 in Budapest (Rózsavölgyi meansRose Valley’, where the business startedby Zsolt Szabad and his wife, Katalin Csiszar, who source their cocoa beans directly from the growers in Venezuela. A-Gent of Style discovered them a few weeks ago in his favourite corner shop (Selfridges), Rózsavölgyi Csokoládé‘s sole retailer in the UK. Once again, it is the beautiful packaging and graphics that grabbed A-Gent: patterns taken from old archives and documents, or specially created designs with charming, quirky animals and foliage, bas-relief motifs ‘gaufraged’ on the chocolate bars (most of them are actually square) redolent of heraldic designs or crests, and a cute sticker in shocking pink representing a heart with legs, arms and a hat, all attributed to Csiszar’s artistic flair (she has degrees in animation and illustration).




But it isn’t just the exteriors that are scrumptious. Once the ravishing packaging is unwrapped (ripped apart in A-Gent‘s case), the world of Rózsavölgyi Csokoládé reveals and offers a wide variety of delicacies from single chocolate bars for purists to wildly experimental types for the daredevil pleasure-seekers like moi.
Currently, they produce eight different single-origin tablets, more than 40 bonbons, 20 seasoned tablets, truffles, dragées, and cacao beans with flavours ranging from Caramelised Lavender with Star Anise, Cardamom, Black Sesame Seeds, Hot Paprika, Hazelnuts with Ginger, and Pistachio Gianduja 77% to name but a few. They also produce some quirky delicacies like Rusty Chocolate Tools (wrenches, pliers, clipping pliers, padlocks, old keys, horse-shoes…), a salami-shaped Off the Hook chocolate block and Chocolate Statues.

Their tablets were awarded Silver and Bronze medals in the 2011 Academy of Chocolate Awards (London) in the “Bean-to-Bar Best Dark Bar” main category.


The award-winning roasted olives chocolate bar made with Trincheras chocolate, toasted olives, bread and a little hint of olive oil was tried and tested as soon as A-Gent of Style left the store and was engulfed by the time the lights at the pedestrian crossing turned green; the flavours are still lingering. There is also a Lavender Hot Chocolate cone waiting in the kitchen cupboard at home that is screaming to be opened and turned into drinking chocolate. From tomorrow, the temperatures in London will be dropping so that will be A-Gent’s excuse to pour himself a delicious cup of very special coco. 


Rózsavölgyi Csokoládé originality, sensational flavour combinations, meticulous attention to detail and careful provenance of ingredients make this
‘new-kid-on-the-block’ a top new contender amongst the big fish of the world chocolatiers. Happy savouring!

 

ΕΥΧΑΡΙΣ or ENFILADES



 
It must have been providence.

Yesterday afternoon, A-Gent of Style was indulging in some much-needed retail therapy and, like a homing pigeon, ended up swanning around Fortnum & Mason. For two hours. Bliss.


Paolo Moschino

Paolo Moschino

 

luis bustamante

Luis Bustamante

 

A-Gent of Style was on the look-out for a new morning after-shave (“invigorating zingy, zesty, citrussy scent, not fruity and with no woody undertones please”) but in the back of his mind, A-Gent of Style kept reminding himself he had to find by the end of the day an appropriate preamble for today’s post that would seamlessly introduce the topic du jour. And suddenly it appeared before him. As he smelt and sprayed some of
Geo. F. Trumper gentlemanly scents, A-Gent of Style picked up “Eucris”, resplendent in its black packaging and white graphics, intrigued by its name and meaning.



He turned the box and the description on the back said: “Eucris, a classic both modern and traditional. The word is derived from the Eukharis of Classical Greek
meaning ‘of pleasing quality and elegant proportions'”. Bingo. Ευχαρίς was the perfect, befitting word to describe…enfilades.

The Farewell of Telemachus and Eucharis by Jacques-Louis David, 1818

The Farewell of Telemachus and Eucharis by Jacques-Louis David, 1818



In architecture, an enfilade is a suite of rooms formally aligned with each other. The doors entering each room are aligned with the doors of the connecting rooms along a single axis, providing a vista through the entire suite of rooms.
Enfilades are not to be confused, by the way, with corridors which are, as we know, mere passages connecting parts of a house or building. And the main structural difference is that corridors lead onto rooms with doors whereas the rooms in an enfilade only retain door frames and their architraves but are free of doors hence the linear arrangement and continuous, unbroken view from one end to another.

Enfilades were created centuries ago but it is during the Baroque era that they came into prominence not just for aesthetic reasons but also for stately expressions of hierarchies and stature. Access down an enfilade suite of state rooms typically was restricted by the rank or degree of intimacy of the visitor. The first rooms were more public, and usually at the end was the bedroom, sometimes with an intimate cabinet or boudoir beyond. Baroque protocol for instance dictated that visitors of lower rank than their host would be escorted by servants down the enfilade to the farthest room their status allowed. By extension, they become a visual symbol of the principles of absolute power (the megalomaniac Louis XIV indulged in having enfilades built wherever he lived).


Plan of the first floor at the Chateau de Versailles, 1679



You can clearly see on the plan above two enfilades, one running from room 8 down to F on the left-hand side and from room 7 down to room 1 on the right-hand side.

Subsequently, royal palaces and stately homes followed suit and later on museums and art galleries too were built with enfilades to give uninterrupted view of the art on display to emphasise its significance and inject a dose of drama.


The small white squares indicate door frames. Here for instance an enfilade runs ceaselessly  throughout room N all the way to room G.

 

Principal level plan of Tate Britain, London




Today enfilades are found in some contemporary houses and give a very elegant flow and sense of rhythm to an interior when walking from one room to another.  Truth be said, enfilades are grand and accentuate the proportions of the building and the height of the ceiling. They also allow great scope for juxtaposing the decoration of the connected rooms.







The last private residence A-Gent of Style went to which had an enfilade was Veere Grenney’s much storied previous London apartment, a sight to behold. A-Gent of Style’s heart was in his mouth when he first visited a few years ago the ravishing views of the three interconnecting rooms with high ceilings and views over the River Thames and Battersea Park’s Pagoda.



Veere Grenney's River Thames apartment

Veere Grenney’s River Thames apartment

 

Veere Grenney's River Thames apartment

Veere Grenney’s River Thames apartment




Ευχαρίς, enfilades certainly are that and suddenly this word seems to be the most beautiful in the world.


Versailles

Versailles

 




via Miguel Flores-Vianna

via Miguel Flores-Vianna




Villa Barbaro, Vicenza

Villa Barbaro, Vicenza

 

Luis Bustamante

Luis Bustamante

 

Holkham Hall, Norfolk

Holkham Hall, Norfolk

 

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By Stephen Sills

By Stephen Sills

 

 



Mrs Blandings's house from the movie 'Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House' (1948)

Mrs Blandings’s house from the movie ‘Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House’ (1948)

 





Compiègne Castle, Picardy, France

Compiègne Castle, Picardy, France

 







Catherine Palace, Moscow

Catherine Palace, Moscow

 

Bode Museum, Berlin

Bode Museum, Berlin

 



Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat

 









By Chahan Minassian

By Chahan Minassian

 

Ham House, Richmond-upon-Thames

Ham House, Richmond-upon-Thames

 



By John Saladino

By John Saladino

 

Thorvaldsens Museum, Copenhagen

Thorvaldsens Museum, Copenhagen

 

Musée Jacquemart-André

Musée Jacquemart-André

 

Swedish enfilade

Swedish enfilade

 

Ginny Magher's Provencal home

Ginny Magher’s Provencal home

 

By David Kleinberg

By David Kleinberg

 







By McMillen, Inc

By McMillen, Inc




NB: a big ‘efkharistó‘ to my dear friend Kostas for his didactic help during my research.

NNB: if you ever wondered, A-Gent of Style sadly didn’t settle on Eucris (too woody and musky for his liking) but found a beautiful, old-fashioned scent:
Blood Orange & Basil. Perfect to prolong the almost distant summer!




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