SMALL PLACE, BIG STATEMENT





Some of you might remember my retrospective Going Bananas a few months ago about the arguably most iconic pattern of the 20th C, the banana leaf.

Courtesy of Domaine

Courtesy of Domaine


The inspirational American online lifestyle company Domaine released yesterday on their website a brilliant instructional, step-by-step video showing how to hang wallpaper featuring the vibrant Martinique to add a touch of Beverley Hills Hotel to your home, à la Don Loper – he who invented Martinique in 1942.

Another fine example that trends fade away but style lasts!





Instructions:

INSPECT YOUR WALLPAPER:
1. Unroll & check for holes, correct colors & size

PREP WALLS
1. Make sure walls are clean, smooth, sanded & primed
2. Measure and map walls

READY TO START:
1. Cut paper into strips, leaving a few inches top & bottom to trim
2. With roller, apply remixed vinyl adhesive.
4. Use level to make sure first strip is straight.
5. Remove air bubbles with smoothing tool
6. Align patterns carefully & close with seam roller (to help edge lay flat)
7. Trim edges with a razor blade (careful!)
8. Go over entire paper with moist sponge (to remove any glue)
9. Repeat – change blades frequently to stay sharp
*TIP* When going around corners, carefully cut paper & tuck

CLEAN IT UP!
1. Cut all trims
2. Go over with moist sponge again

Et voila!




ARCHITECT TO THE CROWN: JAMES WYATT





Today’s subject is less contemporary (we are going back three centuries) and slightly more scholarly than Monday’s (see A-Gent of Style‘s review of the new and fascinating exhibition on fashionista Isabella Blow) but it concerns another tastemaker who hopefully will be equally appealing to you all.







On Monday, A-Gent of Style was delighted to be invited at lunchtime
by Sibyl Colefax and John Fowler – the distinguished interior design and decoration company – to a Press Preview at their legendary offices on Brook Street, W1 for a special exhibition organised between them and The Georgian Group commemorating the bicentenary of James Wyatt (1746-1813), one of the most accomplished and fashionable English architects of late 18th century, and celebrating his life, career and achievements in furniture, interior decoration and architecture through some of his most important projects such as Windsor Castle, Fonthill Abbey, Goodwood House, Heaton Hall, Castle Coole
and Heveningham Hall.



 “James Wyatt: Architect to the Crown and Designer of Complete Interiors” opened on Tuesday to the public until December, 6 (Monday-Friday 9.30am-5.30pm, free entrance so no excuse) and will be hosted at the Sybil Colefax & John Fowler headquarters, 39 Brook Street, London W1, a rare surviving Grade II example of a Regency house, in the very same house altered and extended by James Wyatt’s nephew and pupil, Jeffry Wyatt (later Sir Jeffry Wyatville). After being used as a ballroom later on, the upper floor gallery was then redecorated in the late 1950s by the legendary John Fowler as a drawing room for Nancy Lancaster, the then owner of the company, resulting in the iconic ‘Yellow Room’.

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It is always exciting to go to Brook Street; A-Gent of Style hadn’t been back since last year but still marvelled at each of the beautifully decorated rooms replete with truly exquisite furniture and objets as he made his way upstairs
to the ‘Yellow Room’. The room has been specially transformed for the exhibition but still has the ‘wow factor’: as soon as you step in, the high-gloss lacquered yellow walls give you this feeling of wonder and awe. And the yellow silk curtains are simply ravishing.



Designed specifically to complement the interiors Wyatt created at
Heveningham Hall, a selection of pieces of furniture are the focus of this collaborative exhibition designed by George Carter, and thanks to the generosity
of English Heritage, chairs, tripod flower stands, demi-lune tables, torchère and mirrors are on display for the first time in thirty years (the furniture was acquired by the government in the 1970s when Heveningham was sold by the Vanneck family) and it is a delight and a privilege to such beautifully crafted objects.
Their neo-classical refinement and delicacy (there are some clues to Gothic Revival too) bring freshness and seeming simplicity. It is worth noticing that much of Wyatt’s furniture was painted rather than carved and gilded, enhancing its delicate originality. And the palette of pastel colours and their combinations are magnificent (green and blue being one of them).











1778 chair by James Wyatt

1778 chair by James Wyatt


“Many of Wyatt’s furniture designs for Gillows passed into the hands of George Hepplewhite, a Gillow employee” explains the Georgian Group. They were published posthumously by Mrs Hepplewhite without any acknowledgment of the true designer. This plagiarism helped to immortalize the Wyatt style of neo-classical furniture design, as Wyatt himself never published his own work”.













Other items such as Wyatt’s original working drawings, sketches, engravings and some silverware made by Matthew Boulton (a couple of tureens) are on show as well as twelve modern watercolours of Wyatt interiors by Royston Jones, which are for sale. There is also a spectacular architectural model of Fonthill Spendens still in great condition. And if you have a close look at the model, you will see a small fountain in the courtyard. Don’t miss it.

Silver designed for Matthew Boulton

Silver designed by Wyatt and made by Matthew Boulton






To further your interest and knowledge about James Wyatt, three special lectures have been conceived to complement the exhibition:

21st November 2013 – Lecture / From Wyatt to Wyatville: an Architectural Dynasty, by Charles Hind, Chief Curator at The Royal Institute of British Architects

25th November 2013 – Lecture / James Wyatt, Furniture Designer, by architectural historian Dr John Martin Robinson

Doors open at 6.30pm for a 7pm start at Colefax & Fowler, 39 Brook Street, London W1; £20 to include a pre-lecture glass of wine, which can be book by calling the Colefax Group Press Office on 020 7493 2231 or by email pressoffice@colefax.com



 
The exhibition is curated by Dr John Martin Robinson, an architectural historian and foremost expert on the Wyatt architectural dynasty. He is the author of a recently published and beautifully illustrated book, James Wyatt, Architect to George III, which has received great critical acclaim and will be on sale during the exhibition. Also on sale are postcards and tea towels featuring designs of commissions and furniture by James Wyatt. Perfect stocking fillers for Christmas!






Thanks to this fascinating, informative exhibition and series of lectures,
James Wyatt is given the recognition he highly deserves.

Make sure you attend!



– All photographs of the exhibition and the ‘Yellow Room’
by Sibyl Colefax and John Fowler with the Georgian Group –




LEARNING HIS STRIPES: PAUL SMITH & THE DESIGN MUSEUM






Today’s recipient needs little introduction. Most of you will have instantly recognised the image above and will have, at one point or another, held a bag or a gift box adorned by this iconic pinstriped barcode with its trademark rainbow of multifarious colours that is universally associated with the signature logo of …




Paul Smith‘s illustrious career and exceptional impact on the world of fashion and retail is the subject of a much-anticipated exhibition this winter
at the brilliant Design Museum in London.

“Hello, my name is Paul Smith” is a major retrospective opening on Friday until March 9, 2014 that will give a comprehensive insight into the five decades of the British designer and retailer’s world, influences, achievements and working methods.


Due to the huge popularity and influence of the designer (his empire is represented in 72 countries), the exhibition is likely to appeal to a broad audience and break visitor figure records – and even the Design Museum’s own records as it already celebrated the designer in 2001 with its ‘True Brit” exhibition.




The rich visual experience curated by Donna Loveday (she of the museum’s hugely successful Christian Louboutin show last year) will take the shape of a long corridor and will chart the designer, retailer and businessman’s career throughout various media (music, photographs, artifacts, projections, films, soundbites) and approaches such as these:




a display of Sir Paul’ Smith’s daring sartorial creations from collections selected by the designer himself dating back to his first show in Paris in 1976 up to today
(the company shows an impressive fourteen different collections every year), personal archives, hand-drawn sketches and other inspirational elements that make Paul Smith’s mind tick and creativity flow, a reconstruction of Smith’s first humble 1970 shop in Nottingham famously measuring three metres square, a makeshift version of his current studio and a room dedicated to the paraphernalia he’s received from his adoring fans throughout the years, most probably from Japan where his fan base is huge.








Another area will also be devoted to his architect wife Pauline whom has had a huge influence on his work, another one will showcase the unique design behind each of his stores accompanied by selection of jewellery, books, artworks, antiques, objets and curiosités that typically complement the clothes, and of course his great, whimsical collaborations ranging from cars (Rover’s Mini), cameras (Leica) and rugs (The Rug Company) to water bottles (Evian) and bicycles (Rapha) – Smith aspired to a be a professional cyclist until a road accident crushed his dreams when he was fifteen – and a special feature giving the visitors a glimpse into the brand’s future projects.






From his impeccably smart and tailored menswear and womenswear, his inventive approach to fabric, colour and pattern to his principles of traditional craftsmanship of tailoring and techniques with a contemporary edge, and his ‘English eccentric’ twist and Brit-wit style,  A-Gent of Style has been a huge admirer of Sir Paul Smith and looks forward to entering this world of “creation, inspiration, collaboration, wit and beauty” that epitomises the man behind one of the most quintessential British labels and leading fashion brands in the world.



Paul Smith stores – interiors and exteriors

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Paul Smith Spring/Summer 2014 collection

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Paul Smith objets and collaborations

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A Channel 4 interview





A BBC interview






During the run of the exhibition, the Design Museum will be hosting a series of exciting events such as Paul Smith Instagram Takeover, Live Twitter Q&A with Paul Smith and Sophie Hicks on Designing for Paul Smith.








A book “Hello, My Name is Paul Smith” published by Rizzoli will be published to coincide with the exhibition



 

 

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