RIP JAIME PARLADE: GREAT SENOR of DECORACION






  – Jaime Parladé : “This southern gentleman, with the disdain of a Dandy, enslaves his clients like a gigolo. He is the person that gives splendour to the houses of the powerful. Distilling the Spanish Country House Ideal at Alcuzcuz in Andalusia (Spain)” – Raul del Pozo, El Mundo, August 2007


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If it wasn’t for Helen Cormack, A-Gent of Style must admit he wouldn’t have heard last week of the death of Jaime Parladé. Actually, if it hadn’t been for Helen herself citing Parladé as one of her favourite decorators in her interview on this blog almost two years ago, A-Gent of Style might not have come across the discreet Spanish decorator altogether. Shameful revelation. And Jaime Parladé deserves to be lauded.


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Very little if hardly anything has been mentioned in the English press and social media about Parladé’s death a fortnight ago, and the only few tributes have been mostly from the Spanish press or tweets. If you Google Parladé’s name, there is little to be found about his death and not much information in fact about his life and distinguished career. There is however a short biography on his website but no photos of his projects.No mean feat for A-Gent of Style who was looking for clues to do his research for a feature celebrating the talented señor. There was however the brilliant monogram Jaime Parladé, A Personal Style that A-Gent of Style could rely ona must for every decorating aficionado.

Jaime Parladé, Marques of Apezteguia, who has been dubbed “the doyen of Spanish designers” by Architectural Digest magazine, and whose English wife, Janetta, has links to the Bloomsbury Group, decorated homes for the most distinguished families in Europe, including the Rothschilds, the Bismarcks and the Duchess of Alba.

Jaime Parladé’s interiors have somehow been a revelation to A-Gent of Style as they have proved to be a great visual exercise for relaxed, unpretentious yet considered decorating mixing English comfort, French refinement and ‘the grace and delicacy of Andalusia’. Whilst the rooms he decorated can seem exuberant at times, dare I say it overcrowded, they all provide a sense of comfort and calm, and they undeniably look like inviting, lived-in spaces. His talent laid in mixing an eclectic selection of furniture and objects accumulated through his lifetime and inherited from his ancestors. It would be fair to say that Parladé was also a master of colours, a daring one at that, who wouldn’t bat an eyelid at painting adjacent walls and furniture with bright, garish, contrasting colours, to great success. A-Gent of Style particularly relished his treatment of ceilings and the way he tended to paint beams in all sorts of vivid colours.

So, today we pay homage to a great decorator of the 20th century who, despite keeping himself ‘under the radar’ and coming from an ‘old school’ generation of decorators eschewing the limelight, is leaving behind him an inspiring, brilliant and colourful legacy.



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PRICKLY SUBJECT: THE PINEAPPLE EXTRAVAGANZA





Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler

from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler



The pineapple has long been a symbol of hospitality in design and architecture and is still trending today. So what better way to start the new year with a token of welcome, friendliness and graciousness and a compilation of images celebrating the now universal exotic and prickly fruit.

A-Gent of Style started compiling images of pineapples represented in interior design about six months ago and this feature wouldn’t have been possible partly without the help of the treasure trove of inspiration that is Instagram, so a big thank-you first and foremost to all my follow Instagramers from whom some of these images are borrowed.



"Pineapple" wallpaper by Adelphi Paper Hangings

“Pineapple” wallpaper by Adelphi Paper Hangings

 

Lyford Cay Club, Tom Scherrer

Lyford Cay Club, by Tom Scheerer

 

Lyford Cay Club, by Tom Scheerer

Lyford Cay Club, by Tom Scheerer

 

Christopher Columbus discovered the pineapple, or ananas colossus, when he landed in Guadeloupe in 1493 and introduced it to the west on his return as “pine of the Indians”. This beautiful exotic fruit was given as a gift to promote hospitality and welcome. Pineapples were then extremely expensive (sugar and sweets were very uncommon) and were considered as a sign of prestige and affluence, first adorning homes and tables; much prized, the pineapple was often the centrepiece of table displays. In fact, people who could not afford to serve pineapples could rent them, use them as a centerpiece, and give them back after their banquet was over. By the 18th century, architects in Europe introduced the fruit in their work, carved in wood and stone, because of their novelty and value.

The Dunmore Pineapple, Scotland, a folly and summerhouse built for the fourth Earl of Dunmore in 1761 on the ground of Dunmore House, Scotland, featuring a 14 metre high carved stone pineapple on the top of the building.

The Dunmore Pineapple, Scotland, a folly and summerhouse built for the fourth Earl of Dunmore in 1761 on the ground of Dunmore House, Scotland, featuring a 14 metre high carved stone pineapple on the top of the building.

 

The pineapple folly at Dunmore Estate, Scotland

The pineapple folly at Dunmore Estate, Scotland

 

A seventeenth-century painting of King Charles II receiving the first pineapple ever to be grown in Britain from his gardener. The depiction of the scene is a reflection of just how important an event it was.

A seventeenth-century painting of King Charles II receiving from his gardener the first pineapple ever to be grown in Britain. The depiction of the scene is a reflection of just how important an event it was.



Today, we see pineapples not only on facades and on the framework of historical edifices such as stately homes, churches or government buildings, doorways but also on fabric, wallpaper, tableware, lighting, ornaments, furniture and accessories.

Pineapples – Not just one of your five a day…

 

'The Isis Chair' & 'Pineapple Frond' fabric by Soane Britain

 


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from Irving & Morrison

from Irving & Morrison



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By Rifle Paper Co.

By Rifle Paper Co.

 

Chez Laura Slatkin, screenshot of video by Quintessence & with Susanna Salk

Chez Laura Slatkin, screenshot of video by Quintessence with Susanna Salk



An American painted tole chandelier, 1940s, from Ebury Trading

An American painted tole chandelier, 1940s, from Ebury Trading

 

via Paolo Moschino instagram

via Paolo Moschino instagram

 

Leaf wallpaper by Katie Ridder

Leaf wallpaper by Katie Ridder

 

by Philip Hewat Jaboor

by Philip Hewat-Jaboor

 

by Anthony Hail via Margaret Russell's instagram

by Anthony Hail via Margaret Russell’s instagram



via Michael Bargo instagram

via Michael Bargo instagram



via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram

 

from Brown Rigg antiques

from Brown Rigg antiques

 

Cressida Bell

fabric by Cressida Bell

 

Set of two metal table lamps with glass pineapple adornments from Joss & Main

Set of two metal table lamps with glass pineapple adornments from Joss & Main

 

Carolyne Roehm

Carolyne Roehm

 

Carolyne Roehm via Mark D Sikes instagram

Carolyne Roehm via Mark D Sikes instagram



via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram



Pineapple silk damask by De Gournay

Pineapple silk damask by De Gournay

 

De Gournay silk damask

De Gournay silk damask

 

via Pigotts Store instragram

via Pigotts Store instagram



Console table by Chelsea Textiles at Ham Yard Hotel

Console table by Chelsea Textiles at Ham Yard Hotel



Talbot Green Brocatelle. An original design by A W N Pugin taken from a set of vestments at Pugin's own church St Augustine's Ramsgate and rewoven for St Chad's Metropolitan Cathedral, Birmingham. Watts and Co. Church Fabric Supplier

Talbot Green Brocatelle. An original design by A W N Pugin represented by Watts & Co taken from a set of vestments at Pugin’s own church St Augustine’s Ramsgate and rewoven for St Chad’s Metropolitan Cathedral, Birmingham. Watts and Co. Church Fabric Supplier

 

by Cressida Bell

by Cressida Bell

 

Studio Printworks pineapple wallpaper or fabric

Studio Printworks Pineapple wallpaper or fabric

 

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The Rug Company

from The Rug Company

 

via Piggots Store instagram

via Piggots Store instagram

 

Chelsea Textiles

by Chelsea Textiles

 Julie Tinton

photograph by Julie Tinton

via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram



via Alessandra Branca instagram

Interior by and via Alessandra Branca instagram

 

 

Rose & Grey

Wisteria by Rose Tarlow

Wisteria by Rose Tarlow

 

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PINEAPPLE WHITE PALM WG


Muriel Brandolini

by Muriel Brandolini

 

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Tinto wools by Zoffany

Tinto wools by Zoffany

 

from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. A 1940s six branch tole chandelier in the form of a pineapple, French

from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. A 1940s six branch tole chandelier in the form of a pineapple, French





King's Head, Vanderhurd

King’s Head, fabric by Vanderhurd

 

from 1stDibs

from 1stDibs



 Julie Tinton

photograph by Julie Tinton

 

By Henri fitzwilliam lay, H&G Dec 2013

By Henri fitzwilliam lay, H&G Dec 2013

 

KRISHNAJI HOWLAJI ARA (1914-1985) UNTITLED (STILL LIFE); UNTITLED (BALLARD PIER)

by Krishna Howlaji Ara, Untitled (still life)

 

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by smallable.com via madabouthehouse.com

by smallable.com via madabouthehouse.com




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via A Decorative Affair instagram

via adecorativeaffair instagram

 

Atelier d'Offard

fabric by Atelier d’Offard

 

Greg Kinsella

wallpaper by Greg Kinsella

 

Marie Helene de Taillac, NYC

Interior of Marie Helene de Taillac, NYC

 

The Pineapple Frond wallpaper by Soane Britain

The Pineapple Frond wallpaper by Soane Britain

 

Rose & Grey

by Rose & Grey

 

Nicky Haslam Design for OKA

Nicky Haslam Design for OKA

 

via Piggots Store instagram

via Piggots Store instagram

 

by House of Hackney

by House of Hackney

 

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via A Decorative Affair instagram

via adecorativeaffair instagram

 

Abigail Ahern

by Abigail Ahern

 

Pineapple fabric - Waverly Fabric Collection: Island Life

Pineapple fabric – Waverly Fabric Collection: Island Life

 

Maison CHARLES -Pair of Pineapple Motif Table Lamps from 1stdibs.com |

Maison CHARLES -Pair of Pineapple Motif Table Lamps from 1stdibs.com

 

Dorothy Draper framed Pineapple fabric, panel signed from 1stdibs.com |

Dorothy Draper framed Pineapple fabric, panel signed from 1stdibs.com



via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram



Furnishing fabric, Pugin from the V&A

Furnishing fabric by Pugin from the V&A

 

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from Paolo Moschino's Instagram

via paolomoschino instagram

 

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House of Hackney

by House of Hackney



Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) visited Queensland in 1920 on behalf of his father, King George V, to thank Australians for the part they had played in World War I. The banquet at Finney’s Cafe was gaily printed in the shape of a pineapple, and it is one of the earliest menus in the ‘royal visits’ collection.

Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) visited Queensland in 1920 on behalf of his father, King George V, to thank Australians for the part they had played in World War I. The banquet at Finney’s Cafe was gaily printed in the shape of a pineapple, and it is one of the earliest menus in the ‘royal visits’ collection.



Rose & Grey

by Rose & Grey

 

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Pentreath Hall

by Pentreath Hall

 

By Hannah Rampley

by Hannah Rampley

 

Staircase finial at Durham Castle

Staircase finial at Durham Castle

 

Little Greene

by Little Greene

 

Thornback & Peel

by Thornback & Peel

 

A German silver pineapple cup and cover, 1610, that belonged to Michael Inchbald. Christie's auction 2014

A German silver pineapple cup and cover, 1610, that belonged to Michael Inchbald. Christie’s auction 2014

 

 

By Timourous beasties

by Timourous Beasties

 

from www.Bungalow1a.com

from www.Bungalow1a.com

 

 

Mariette Himes Gomez. Architectural Digest

Interior by Mariette Himes Gomez. Architectural Digest

 

Veronese in raspberry & silvery gold, Fortuny

Veronese in raspberry & silvery gold, by Fortuny

 

Rocket St George

by Rockett St George



'Pineapple' by Studio Printworks

‘Pineapple’ by Studio Printworks

 

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Male Fashion Trends: Michael Bastian Spring/Summer 2014

Male Fashion Trends: Michael Bastian Spring/Summer 2014



'The Pineapple Lamp' by Soane Britain

‘The Pineapple Lamp’ by Soane Britain



A-Gent of Style camouflaging amongst Pineapple by Adephi Paper Hangings

A-Gent of Style camouflaging amongst ‘Pineapple’ by Adephi Paper Hangings





 

A LONDONER in COPENHAGEN: TAPET CAFE





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On his last day in København, A-Gent of Style hopped onto a train towards Gentofte, 20 minutes north of the Danish capital, to enter the enchanting world of
TAPET-CAFE.


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 TAPET-CAFE (tapet meaning wallpaper in Danish) is the internationally renown Danish firm specialising in the design and production of hand printed textiles, wallpaper, custom-made curtains and fine upholstery which also creates bespoke interior designs for boutiques, designer stores, restaurants, hotels and private homes. And last but not least, they are also purveyor to the Royal Danish Court – hence the royal stamp of approval on their logo.


Back home in the UK, TAPET-CAFE has established itself primarily as discerning creators of paper hangings, familiar to A-Gent of Style as they are represented by Helen Cormack at Tissus d’Hélène, the go-to boutique textiles showroom in London’s Design Centre. The award-winning TAPET-CAFE make regular appearances in leading design magazines and has exhibited at Decorex in the last two years with arresting vignettes.


Decorex

Decorex 2013

 

Decorex 2014

Decorex 2014



Founded in 1974 and still based in Gentofte, Copenhagen, in what used to be an old dairy and family house, the company is now owned by Jannik Martensen-Larsen – whose family business has been running through generations – and his wife Helene Blanche, both of whom A-Gent of Style has had the privilege to meet in London on a couple of occasions in the last few years, and these days, on a daily basis via Instagram – where else!


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Having successfully designed over the years various collections of wallpapers for other companies, Jannnik and Helene, Head of Design at TAPET-CAFE and a textile graduate from Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design in London, decided to launch a few years ago their own wallpaper and fabric collection, The Private Collection, under their own name. All drawn and painted by hand, Helene’s striking creations are suffused with a traditional Danish legacy and Nordic influences mixed with a contemporary feel that ranges from botanicals and romantic, poetic motifs (favourite: The Tea House), to bolder graphics and Art Deco (favourite: Deco Fan), all telling different stories.

“My ambition and dream has been to create a design house of patterns and colours – a world of interiors, focusing on bespoke wallpaper and textile designs”, says Jannik. “It is a privilege to develop and expand our family business and we value to work with craftsmen, designers and clients through generations”.



A-Gent of Style didn’t expect less from his visit and the TAPET-CAFE boutique showroom, situated a stone’s throw from the train station; whilst the charming and almost centenary-old building has been repainted in striking burnt orange, the interior is handsomely enveloped by a plethora of harmonious colours and patterns, combining a mix of the company’s own products as well as carefully selected design brands represented in Denmark by TAPET-CAFE such as De Gournay, Jennifer Shorto, Chelsea Textiles furniture and Farrow & Ball.

“I constantly experiment with hand drawing using a mix of charcoal, ink and watercolour, to create the first sketches of pattern. I believe it’s important to maintain an open and playful work progress, so that the finished design is dynamic and vivacious. its not about prettiness and perception, but also about playing and experimenting with colours and scale” – Helene Blanche


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The delightful and ever-charming couple were not only generous with their time showing me around the shop – used until not so long ago as living quarters and now solely used as showroom and offices – but also around the floors upstairs where each room had just been redecorated to show off different, stunning mise-en-scènes and vignettes, with a (current) common denominator: shades of green, blue and teal – an ineluctable bonding element between Helene and A-Gent of Style. Helene also kindly let me in a few secrets and showed me her new, unfinished designs, that already promise to be appealing. Stay tuned!



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– Photos by TAPET-CAFE and A-Gent of Style – 





A LONDONER IN COPENHAGEN : STUDIO OLIVER GUSTAV





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Whilst the sunny, gently windswept weather A-Gent of Style was graced with during his stay in Copenhagen in the last week couldn’t have been more fortuitous, most of his peregrinations took place in the moody, atmospheric, dare I say it, romantic light of dusk that struck punctually every day after 3.48pm – that’s Scandinavia for you in the winter months.

Judging from his own experiences (all documented on Instagram, ad nauseam), København certainly lived up to its reputation as the most liveable city of the year (as voted in 2014 by Monocle magazine for the second consecutive year), and A-Gent of Style will hasten to add, an enchanting and vibrant one at that. The Nordic style in design is still all the rage and the world is currently looking north for inspiration which will explain why Copenhagen has long been on the global style radar.

As serendipity would have it, he stumbled across a great find one day in what soon became his favourite street in the hip quarter of Nyhavn where he was staying.


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Moody and atmospheric too but also ethereal, nude and minimal is that special space that is the brainchild of creative consultant and interior designer Oliver Gustav.


From his eponymous studio, showroom and boutique, debonair Oliver Gustav offers unique and limited edition pieces, objets, natural curiosities and some beautiful (Belgian) linens from a carefully curated edit of international designers and artists, not too dissimilar to Willer in London, Galerie Salon in Paris (both featured by A-Gent of Style) John Derian in New York, and Gray Gallery in L.A. Set on a monochrome backdrop, mixed with strong and modern cultural influences, Gustav’s peaceful and spellbinding interiors make striking use of light and shadow – like a modern interpretation on chiaroscuro à la Caravaggio – underscoring his attention to surfaces and scale. With this serene ambience, his spaces offer a truly seldom experience rooted in a timeless and beautifully honest simplicity.

This creative sanctuary set in a dramatic atmosphere where the stark and modern are contrasted against rare antique finds and exquisite collectables, such as the special edition Arne Jacobsen Drop Chair and the now much featured Cloud lighting fixture by Apparatus (also storied here), is a great source of inspiration and a must-see for any design enthusiasts in Copenhagen.



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– Photos by A-Gent of Style except photo of Oliver Gustav – 



 

2015



 

Courtesy of Scanlon Apparati

Courtesy of Scanlon Apparati

 

Thank you dear followers for all your support in 2014. It’s been an amazing year and a fantastic journey for A-Gent of Style.
Wishing you the best for 2015.  Let’s make this new year even brighter and more creative.

2014 WAS A REHEARSAL. 2015 IS SHOWTIME.

#nopressure


 

 

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