PRICKLY SUBJECT: THE PINEAPPLE EXTRAVAGANZA





Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler

from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler



The pineapple has long been a symbol of hospitality in design and architecture and is still trending today. So what better way to start the new year with a token of welcome, friendliness and graciousness and a compilation of images celebrating the now universal exotic and prickly fruit.

A-Gent of Style started compiling images of pineapples represented in interior design about six months ago and this feature wouldn’t have been possible partly without the help of the treasure trove of inspiration that is Instagram, so a big thank-you first and foremost to all my follow Instagramers from whom some of these images are borrowed.



"Pineapple" wallpaper by Adelphi Paper Hangings

“Pineapple” wallpaper by Adelphi Paper Hangings

 

Lyford Cay Club, Tom Scherrer

Lyford Cay Club, by Tom Scheerer

 

Lyford Cay Club, by Tom Scheerer

Lyford Cay Club, by Tom Scheerer

 

Christopher Columbus discovered the pineapple, or ananas colossus, when he landed in Guadeloupe in 1493 and introduced it to the west on his return as “pine of the Indians”. This beautiful exotic fruit was given as a gift to promote hospitality and welcome. Pineapples were then extremely expensive (sugar and sweets were very uncommon) and were considered as a sign of prestige and affluence, first adorning homes and tables; much prized, the pineapple was often the centrepiece of table displays. In fact, people who could not afford to serve pineapples could rent them, use them as a centerpiece, and give them back after their banquet was over. By the 18th century, architects in Europe introduced the fruit in their work, carved in wood and stone, because of their novelty and value.

The Dunmore Pineapple, Scotland, a folly and summerhouse built for the fourth Earl of Dunmore in 1761 on the ground of Dunmore House, Scotland, featuring a 14 metre high carved stone pineapple on the top of the building.

The Dunmore Pineapple, Scotland, a folly and summerhouse built for the fourth Earl of Dunmore in 1761 on the ground of Dunmore House, Scotland, featuring a 14 metre high carved stone pineapple on the top of the building.

 

The pineapple folly at Dunmore Estate, Scotland

The pineapple folly at Dunmore Estate, Scotland

 

A seventeenth-century painting of King Charles II receiving the first pineapple ever to be grown in Britain from his gardener. The depiction of the scene is a reflection of just how important an event it was.

A seventeenth-century painting of King Charles II receiving from his gardener the first pineapple ever to be grown in Britain. The depiction of the scene is a reflection of just how important an event it was.



Today, we see pineapples not only on facades and on the framework of historical edifices such as stately homes, churches or government buildings, doorways but also on fabric, wallpaper, tableware, lighting, ornaments, furniture and accessories.

Pineapples – Not just one of your five a day…

 

'The Isis Chair' & 'Pineapple Frond' fabric by Soane Britain

 


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from Irving & Morrison

from Irving & Morrison



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By Rifle Paper Co.

By Rifle Paper Co.

 

Chez Laura Slatkin, screenshot of video by Quintessence & with Susanna Salk

Chez Laura Slatkin, screenshot of video by Quintessence with Susanna Salk



An American painted tole chandelier, 1940s, from Ebury Trading

An American painted tole chandelier, 1940s, from Ebury Trading

 

via Paolo Moschino instagram

via Paolo Moschino instagram

 

Leaf wallpaper by Katie Ridder

Leaf wallpaper by Katie Ridder

 

by Philip Hewat Jaboor

by Philip Hewat-Jaboor

 

by Anthony Hail via Margaret Russell's instagram

by Anthony Hail via Margaret Russell’s instagram



via Michael Bargo instagram

via Michael Bargo instagram



via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram

 

from Brown Rigg antiques

from Brown Rigg antiques

 

Cressida Bell

fabric by Cressida Bell

 

Set of two metal table lamps with glass pineapple adornments from Joss & Main

Set of two metal table lamps with glass pineapple adornments from Joss & Main

 

Carolyne Roehm

Carolyne Roehm

 

Carolyne Roehm via Mark D Sikes instagram

Carolyne Roehm via Mark D Sikes instagram



via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram



Pineapple silk damask by De Gournay

Pineapple silk damask by De Gournay

 

De Gournay silk damask

De Gournay silk damask

 

via Pigotts Store instragram

via Pigotts Store instagram



Console table by Chelsea Textiles at Ham Yard Hotel

Console table by Chelsea Textiles at Ham Yard Hotel



Talbot Green Brocatelle. An original design by A W N Pugin taken from a set of vestments at Pugin's own church St Augustine's Ramsgate and rewoven for St Chad's Metropolitan Cathedral, Birmingham. Watts and Co. Church Fabric Supplier

Talbot Green Brocatelle. An original design by A W N Pugin represented by Watts & Co taken from a set of vestments at Pugin’s own church St Augustine’s Ramsgate and rewoven for St Chad’s Metropolitan Cathedral, Birmingham. Watts and Co. Church Fabric Supplier

 

by Cressida Bell

by Cressida Bell

 

Studio Printworks pineapple wallpaper or fabric

Studio Printworks Pineapple wallpaper or fabric

 

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The Rug Company

from The Rug Company

 

via Piggots Store instagram

via Piggots Store instagram

 

Chelsea Textiles

by Chelsea Textiles

 Julie Tinton

photograph by Julie Tinton

via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram



via Alessandra Branca instagram

Interior by and via Alessandra Branca instagram

 

 

Rose & Grey

Wisteria by Rose Tarlow

Wisteria by Rose Tarlow

 

sulia.com

PINEAPPLE WHITE PALM WG


Muriel Brandolini

by Muriel Brandolini

 

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Tinto wools by Zoffany

Tinto wools by Zoffany

 

from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. A 1940s six branch tole chandelier in the form of a pineapple, French

from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. A 1940s six branch tole chandelier in the form of a pineapple, French





King's Head, Vanderhurd

King’s Head, fabric by Vanderhurd

 

from 1stDibs

from 1stDibs



 Julie Tinton

photograph by Julie Tinton

 

By Henri fitzwilliam lay, H&G Dec 2013

By Henri fitzwilliam lay, H&G Dec 2013

 

KRISHNAJI HOWLAJI ARA (1914-1985) UNTITLED (STILL LIFE); UNTITLED (BALLARD PIER)

by Krishna Howlaji Ara, Untitled (still life)

 

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by smallable.com via madabouthehouse.com

by smallable.com via madabouthehouse.com




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via A Decorative Affair instagram

via adecorativeaffair instagram

 

Atelier d'Offard

fabric by Atelier d’Offard

 

Greg Kinsella

wallpaper by Greg Kinsella

 

Marie Helene de Taillac, NYC

Interior of Marie Helene de Taillac, NYC

 

The Pineapple Frond wallpaper by Soane Britain

The Pineapple Frond wallpaper by Soane Britain

 

Rose & Grey

by Rose & Grey

 

Nicky Haslam Design for OKA

Nicky Haslam Design for OKA

 

via Piggots Store instagram

via Piggots Store instagram

 

by House of Hackney

by House of Hackney

 

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via A Decorative Affair instagram

via adecorativeaffair instagram

 

Abigail Ahern

by Abigail Ahern

 

Pineapple fabric - Waverly Fabric Collection: Island Life

Pineapple fabric – Waverly Fabric Collection: Island Life

 

Maison CHARLES -Pair of Pineapple Motif Table Lamps from 1stdibs.com |

Maison CHARLES -Pair of Pineapple Motif Table Lamps from 1stdibs.com

 

Dorothy Draper framed Pineapple fabric, panel signed from 1stdibs.com |

Dorothy Draper framed Pineapple fabric, panel signed from 1stdibs.com



via Joudran682 instagram

via jourdan682 instagram



Furnishing fabric, Pugin from the V&A

Furnishing fabric by Pugin from the V&A

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.44.44

from Paolo Moschino's Instagram

via paolomoschino instagram

 

chad-barrett-artist-s-pineapple_i-G-27-2753-4R7TD00Z

House of Hackney

by House of Hackney



Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) visited Queensland in 1920 on behalf of his father, King George V, to thank Australians for the part they had played in World War I. The banquet at Finney’s Cafe was gaily printed in the shape of a pineapple, and it is one of the earliest menus in the ‘royal visits’ collection.

Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) visited Queensland in 1920 on behalf of his father, King George V, to thank Australians for the part they had played in World War I. The banquet at Finney’s Cafe was gaily printed in the shape of a pineapple, and it is one of the earliest menus in the ‘royal visits’ collection.



Rose & Grey

by Rose & Grey

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 16.21.01


Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.03.53


Pentreath Hall

by Pentreath Hall

 

By Hannah Rampley

by Hannah Rampley

 

Staircase finial at Durham Castle

Staircase finial at Durham Castle

 

Little Greene

by Little Greene

 

Thornback & Peel

by Thornback & Peel

 

A German silver pineapple cup and cover, 1610, that belonged to Michael Inchbald. Christie's auction 2014

A German silver pineapple cup and cover, 1610, that belonged to Michael Inchbald. Christie’s auction 2014

 

 

By Timourous beasties

by Timourous Beasties

 

from www.Bungalow1a.com

from www.Bungalow1a.com

 

 

Mariette Himes Gomez. Architectural Digest

Interior by Mariette Himes Gomez. Architectural Digest

 

Veronese in raspberry & silvery gold, Fortuny

Veronese in raspberry & silvery gold, by Fortuny

 

Rocket St George

by Rockett St George



'Pineapple' by Studio Printworks

‘Pineapple’ by Studio Printworks

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-01 at 17.29.01


Male Fashion Trends: Michael Bastian Spring/Summer 2014

Male Fashion Trends: Michael Bastian Spring/Summer 2014



'The Pineapple Lamp' by Soane Britain

‘The Pineapple Lamp’ by Soane Britain



A-Gent of Style camouflaging amongst Pineapple by Adephi Paper Hangings

A-Gent of Style camouflaging amongst ‘Pineapple’ by Adephi Paper Hangings





 

THE TWINKLE of CHRISTMAS at the DESIGN CENTRE, CHELSEA HARBOUR





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 You’d have to be a Scrooge not to like a Twinkle.

It is the season to be merry, so a fortnight ago, in between work commitments and a design bloggers-only event hosted by Linley later on that evening,
A-Gent of Style made his way to his ‘home from home’, the much cherished Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour for its annual Twinkle of Christmas, now in its fifth year, to celebrate the festive season in a jolly, glamourous and convivial atmosphere

Attended by a plethora of designers, taste makers, and representatives from the design centre’s 102 showrooms, Claire German, Managing Director of the DCCH, and her team invited their guests to the capital’s legendary creative and commercial hub of interior design to enjoy festive fizz, hot chocolate, doughnuts, star treats and marshmallows from a snow wall amongst ethereal stilt-walkers whilst smooth harmonies from the Rat Pack provided seasonal good cheer beneath a constellation of twinkling lights.


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Despite its magical scintillation and sparkle, the glamorous event wouldn’t have been truly starry without the much-anticipated attendance of its surprise celebrity. This year’s guest of honour (and best well-kept secret) was Darcey Bussell, principal dancer, judge of BCC’s Strictly Come Dancing and now national darling, who, ahem, swanned in the middle dome to be welcomed onto the stage by students from her old school, Royal Ballet School. With the support of a huge crowd, La Bussell switched on the lights and the spectacular glass domes the design centre were illuminated by a galaxy of glowing stars, a sight to behold.

‘It’s such an inspirational place to come to,’ said Darcey. ‘I have always been a big fan of the creative world, and I’m very happy to add to this festive occasion’.

With all of these perfect ingredients thrown into the mix, The Twinkle of Christmas has now become without a doubt an unmissable annual tradition and a firm fixture in London’s design calendar.

  Twinkle, twinkle…


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– Photos by the Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour and A-Gent of Style




BOOK END No17





Here is a new selection by A-Gent of Style of noteworthy publications as 2014 comes to an end. Perfect Christmas stocking fillers.

Don’t forget you can hover your cursor over each image to see the rest of the book cover or click on the image to see the cover in full in a new window.




All books are available or can be ordered from The Bookshop at the Design Centre Chelsea Harbour +44 (0) 20 7351 6854 / @theBOOKSHOPat

And if you’ve missed the previous instalments of Book End, you can catch up and see the other fantastic books A-Gent of Style selected over the months:Book End No1Book End No2, Book End N03Book End N04Book End No5Book End No6, Book End No7, Book End N08, Book End No9Book End No10Book End N011Book End N012, Book End N013Book End No14Book End N015, Book End No16.

Happy reading!





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