AN EDUCATED EYE: RATEAU for JEANNE LANVIN and other CHEFS d’OEUVRE





 




Tomorrow afternoon in Paris, Christie’s will be auctioning from a private collection some important and striking pieces of the 20th C and 21st C by design maestros such as Rulhmann, Printz, Anthonioz and Jean-Michel Frank. First and foremost is a selection below of collectibles that grabbed A-Gent of Style‘s attention. 






























 














You can view the full catalogue here



But most importantly, there will also be twelve wonderful objets for sale by ones of France’s greatest Art Deco designers, Armand Albert Rateau, created for his friend, the legendary couturier Jeanne Lanvin. 









Rateau and Lanvin met through the couturier Paul Poiret in the early 1920s and she became one of Rateau’s most important clients. These two remarkable, strong and independent figures of the time started a regular collaboration from 1921, when Jeanne Lanvin established her Lanvin Decoration department, headed by Rateau. They collaborated on prestigious commissions such as the Daunou theatre in Paris, inaugurated in 1921, the interior decoration and furnishings of Lanvin’s villa in Le Vesinet, near Paris, and her townhouse in rue Barbet de Jouy. Furnishings from this scheme were shown alongside the Pavillion de l’Elegance  at the 1925 Paris International Exhibition.

Rateau’s singular and striking style is instantly recognisable to the trained eye and you will see below some of the sophisticated and extremely refined pieces of furniture, lighting, and objects he produced for Lanvin. In noble and pure materials ranging from bronze furniture to carved wood, Rateau’s genius and craft transformed designs influenced by his strong relationship with classical antiquity and Egyptology into the modern language of the time.

This sale is proving to be a great and timely opportunity to revisit and appreciate one of the 20th C ‘s notable design relationships.






































Today, you can see Lanvin’s now iconic private apartment at rue Barbet-de-Jouyat which Rateau designed between 1924 and 1925 re-created at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. Simply divine
















 

 

– All images by Christie’s –


 

 

 

HOTEL de JOBO








Joséphine Bonaparte was actually born Marie Josèphe Rose Tascher de la Pager. Try that as an Instagram handle! But in today’s world, the once French Empress would probably be known on social media and in celebrity magazines as JoBo.

The Martinique-born lover and first wife of Napoléon Bonaparte, Rose de Beauharnais (she was married first to the aristocrat Alexandre de Beauharnais) was renamed “Josephine” by the French emperor. Her style and elegance were emulated across Europe and her influence as an avid art collector and decorator was considerable. Idolised as a style icon and celebrated as a modern woman and trendsetter, it is no wonder she has become today the fantasised inspiration behind a new boutique hotel in Paris.





JoBo came to A-Gent of Style‘s attention only after coming back from Paris Déco Off last month. Little did he know at the time that its charismatic and talented interior decorator was herself too part of the Déco Off’s jury and that they spent the first day together  judging the showrooms!

The Hôtel de Joséphine Bonaparte, in its full designation or simply JoBo to those in the know, opened last summer steps away from La Place des Vosges in Le Marais, the multi-faceted part of old Paris. The once 17th Century convent’s new decor was entirely inspired by and dedicated to Joséphine Bonaparte. The 24 bedrooms and public areas are a riot of colours and bold patterns, and an ode to all things JoBo came to symbolise and love, first and foremost her passion of roses – she had, at the time, the greatest and largest rose collection in the world that was made up of about 250 species and varieties at Malmaison. The flower can be found all around the hotel, either as a wallpaper, a chintz and the carpets throughout the hotel which have been designed by the decorator herself.





Enters Bambi Sloan. A-Gent of Style was mesmerised by all of the images of the hotel he found online as soon as he delved into her creation.  Sloan’s approach is studied and intelligent but also frivolous and gay. The hotel captures the insouciance but also the refinement of the post-French revolution era as well as the eponymous heroine’s character. Sloan playfully throws bold patterns and colours together referencing to the Directoire style with a gentle nod to Madeleine Castaing too (the leopard-print carpet, the turquoise colour, the gauze curtains…). Walls and upholstery are adorned in either plush velvets, Toiles de Jouy, striped tricolour cockade, leopard-print or swirling swags of roses, some of which come from the archives of the iconic Le Manach at Pierre Frey.  The explosion of hot pinks and reds of the Adelphi Paper Hangings wallpapers and friezes as well as the flower power carpet give the corridor a sophisticated and glowing Red Lights district-esque atmosphere. The trompe-l-oeil marquetry parquet and the ebonised and brass detailed furniture anchor the rooms whilst the bathrooms have a more neutral yet impactful palette of black, silver and white marble mosaics. As for the entrance to the hotel, the colourful, flowery, chintzy tented courtyard certainly sets the tone for the rest of the hotel.

Last but not least, thumbs up to the owners of the hotel for having a whole section dedicated to the interior decoration. Not only do they credit the decorator (I always find it puzzling that, online or in some magazines, the creators of what makes the whole venue are hardly ever credited; surely, without them, it wouldn’t be what it is so why ignore them!?) but also they describe the feel and design of the rooms as well as mentioning the names of some of the fabrics or wallpapers and their manufacturers. I like that. A lot.

This wacky but witty rock ‘n’ roll luxurious boudoir has undoubtedly a lot of character and is not for the faint-hearted nor the taupe brigade! It is eccentric, zany, and imbued with history and cheekiness. A-Gent of Style knows exactly where he will be heading first next time he is in ze French capital. The main dilemma will be then: which type of bedroom to stay in?…

And if you want to delve a bit more into Jobo’s life, read the feature Josephine, Imperial Tastemaker I wrote after I reviewed in 2014 an exhibition at the Musee du Luxembourg celebrating the legend.



















































































































































PAST PRESENT FUTURE: DAVID COLLINS STUDIO TURNS 30



 

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Pearls are considered to be the oldest known and the most valuable gems in history as well as being regarded as ones of the highest for their beauty.

Similarly, timelessness, desirability and beauty are attributes that perfectly befit David Collins Studio who turns thirty today and is celebrating its pearl anniversary.


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Having reached this milestone, A-Gent of Style, a long-standing admirer of the Studio’s work and aesthetic, wanted to mark the occasion in his own way as a tribute to and celebration of a towering and much-missed personality of the design world by making a special collaborative feature with the Studio. Rather than looking back at the Studio’s past canon of work, which is much cherished and admired but has already been widely publicised, A-Gent of Style wanted to focus this time on the present and the future by showcasing a diaporama of some of David Collins Studio’s projects since the untimely death in 2013 of its acclaimed and influential creator David Collins, as well as revealing a fascinating interview with the Studio’s Communications Director, David Kendall.


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Far too dynamic to ever rest on its laurels and without a lot of fanfare and too much distraction, the Studio itself is hosting from today for two days only a one-off exhibition curated by Nick Vinson of The Vinson View, Wallpaper*: ‘PAST PRESENT FUTURE” at Philips auction house on Berkeley Square. Bringing together imagery and physical elements from some of the Studio’s most celebrated projects as well as a sneak peek at upcoming ones, the exhibition offers an insight into some of the its most definitive creations of the past three decades including its first trailblazing project La Tante Claire at Royal Hospital Road through some of it most famous destinations including Claridge’s Bar, The Wolseley, Mirabelle, Nobu Berkeley St, Bob Bob Ricard, The Connaught Bar, the Gilbert Scott and Colbert, to name but a few.


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In the last year, David Collins Studio has collaborated with a number of prestigious luxury brands on some of its notable projects to date, including the Continental restaurant at Pacific Place Hong Kong, VOGUE Lounge in Bangkok, and the Garden Lounge at the Corinthia Hotel, London. Two new departments were realised at Harrods and opened during the summer; Eveningwear and Luxury Collections. These followed the 42,000 square feet Harrods Shoe Heaven launched in August 2014. In September 2015, Alexander McQueen launched a new duplex flagship store on Rue Saint-Honoré, which follows flagships in Miami, London, New York and Tokyo, all designed by the Studio. During The London Design Festival 2015, David Collins collaborated with Italian master furniture creators Promemoria to realise the London collection: 14 pieces of furniture expanding an original Capsule Collection launched in April 2013 which have been continually refined and finessed over the last two years. The Studio also provided creative direction for the design of the new home of London Fashion Week at The Brewer Street Car Park last month. Some of you will have seen snippets of some of these projects on A-Gent‘s Instagram.

 

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David Collins Studio’s senior management team: Lewis Taylor, Simon Rawlings, Iain Watkins and David Kendall

 

Over the last three decades, David Collins Studio has become synonymous with redefining luxury interior design around the world and with revolutionising the contemporary aesthetic and urban landscape with its distinctive vision. Remembered for designing some of the most remarkable, innovative and desirable hotels, bars, restaurants, boutiques and residences of the last thirty-odd years in London and all around the world, its achievements are extra-ordinary and its legacy indisputable.

In the last couple of years, The Studio’s imagination and creativity has brought to fruition luxury interior design and architectural projects worldwide that are once again inspiring, unexpected, unique and thankfully not formulaic and faddish. Its incredible team of in-house designers as well as its trusted network of artisans and craftsmen have effortlessly carried the designer’s name and have kept his legacy alive and flourishing without any compromise. Reflecting myriads of influences and inspirations, the new projects are notable for how richly textured their interiors are – The Collection of David Collins estate sale last November at Christie’s was aptly named  “Luxury – Colour – Texture” – and these new projects feel simultaneously contemporary and already established, rooted in the life and traditions of their respective location. Each of them exemplifies the Studio’s extraordinary capacity to grow, flourish and reinvent and reinterpret itself.

 

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An interview with David Kendall, David Collins Studio’s Communications Director

 

David Kendall, Communications Director, David Collins Studio



How did David Collins Studio look back on the last three decades?

We have a vast archive of project imagery going back thirty years, and so we started with this, and really worked with Nick [Vinson] to create an edit of the projects and imagery. Not every project is shown, Nick has curated a series of narratives from the imagery which has been a really interesting process as we are so used to looking at this body of work and it is wonderful to get a different point of view.

 
With such a vast and varied heritage, how did you come up with the most-fitting approach to celebrate this landmark?
 
We discussed a lot of ideas about how to celebrate the anniversary and knew we wanted to create an exhibition, but really when Nick became involved he was able to give clarity to what we would present – he is a very decisive editor!

Why an exhibition? Can you tell us about its genesis and purpose?

The purpose is primarily to celebrate our heritage, our Studio and to look to our future. Beyond that, collaborating with Inca our production company, with Nick Vinson and Leila Latchin our set designer, and with Phillips, has been an amazing opportunity!

 
Tell us about your collaboration with Nick Vinson and his vision for this exhibition. 
 
We have always had a good dialogue with Nick, he understands where The Studio has come from and knows the current team here, so he was the obvious choice. It was so important for this project to find trusted partners, and I think we have been very lucky to have such a great team.


How is the studio balancing the David Collins legacy with the need to develop new ideas?

As a Studio we have never stayed still and the exhibition will demonstrate this. Every David Collins Studio project is sympathetic to its location and so will be different to the next. We have always trialled new ideas and allowed the designers to experiment, and we push ourselves to constantly refine work and not to settle for less than the best we can deliver. 

Would you say there are David Collins design hallmarks or is it more about an underlying ethos? 

You can look at our work and say it is about colour or symmetry or geometry, or texture and detail and lighting, but really the consistent is that our projects function and operate allowing them longevity. Simon Rawlings our creative director worked with David Collins for over 15 years and so he understood and shared his vision. There is an underlying ethos, and that is the spirit with which David built The Studio and mentored his team and the processes that were instilled in the office.

 
Why are clients are still attracted to the David Collins brand? 
 
Well, we are in our thirtieth year and have proven we can deliver! We have a heritage and that is really what this exhibition celebrates! David Collins is our heritage, our projects and their success is our heritage and our clients are our heritage, and when seen together it is a lot to take in! Our 60-strong office behaves professionally and integrates into teams across the globe to realise complex projects.


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What new projects do you have coming up? 
 
We have a number of important projects that we are working on globally. As the exhibition focuses on the past, the present and the future, these are presented in the exhibition to give a snapshot of what is coming next! 

 
In thirty years’ time when people look back, what will they say is David’s legacy?
 
They will see a Studio, they will see a body of work and a canon of projects, they will see a team, and they will see an interiors language that developed but didn’t follow trends and a series of projects that are sympathetic to their location and multi-layered and highly detailed. 
 


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The images below are the undeniable proof that David Collins Studio has turned all of their new enterprises into glorious hallmarks that already bear the creator’s unique and indelible style, vision and DNA. David Collins Studio’s journey to enhance our lives is far from over. It has just started.

– Happy anniversary –

 


Projects by David Collins Studio 2013-2015

Coffeemania

Coffeemania, Moscow, 2013

 

 

One Canada Square

One Canada Square, London, 2013

 

 

Alexander McQueen Tokyo

Alexander McQueen, Tokyo, 2014

 

 

Vogue Lounge, Bangkok

Vogue Lounge, Bangkok, 2014



The Continental

The Continental, Pacific Place, Hong Kong, 2014

 

Jimmy Choo Townhouse, London

Jimmy Choo Townhouse, London, 2014

 

Restaurant at PAD, London, 2014

Restaurant at PAD, London, 2014

 

Mahanakhon

Mahanakhon, Bangkok, 2014

 

London Fashion Week, Brewer Street Car Park, London

London Fashion Week, Brewer Street Car Park, London, 2015

 

London Fashion Week, Brewer Street Car Park, London

London Fashion Week, Brewer Street Car Park, London, 2015

 

Louis Leeman, Madison Ave, New York, 2015

Louis Leeman, Madison Avenue, New York, 2015

 

Promemoria 2015 Collection

Promemoria 2015 Collection, London



Promemoria 2015 Collection

Promemoria 2015 Collection, London

 

The Garden Lounge

The Garden Lounge, The Corinthia Hotel, London, 2015

 

Alexander McQueen, Paris

Alexander McQueen, Paris, 2015

 

 

A special thanks to David Kendall and Jodi Feder at David Collins Studio for their help, trust and support.

– Photos by David Collins Studio –







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