INSPIRED INTERIORS: JEREMIAH GOODMAN and the YELLOW ROOM at COLEFAX & FOWLER



 

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There is a very important event not to be missed at the moment in London.
Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler are currently celebrating until December 5, 2016 artist Jeremiah Goodman and hosting his first London show in the iconic Nancy Lancaster’s Yellow Room, Brook Street. This exhibition, beautifully curated by Dean Rhys Morgan, is slightly tinted with emotions as it the last time one will be able to visit this incredible place before the company moves their headquarters by the end of the year to Pimlico Road (the room has already been stripped of all its furniture). Consider it the end of an era. If you haven’t been yet, this is your last chance. 


Photo from Jeremiah's Instagram

Photo from Jeremiah’s Instagram


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Jeremiah, as he is simply known, is the famed watercolour and gouache illustrator revered within the interior design and architectural communities for his rare ability to infuse empty rooms with warmth and personality. He has worked in some of the most exclusive enclaves in the world and has been commissioned by an illustrious clientèle ranging from the world of literature and theatre (Edward Albee, Greta Garbo, Sir John Gielgud), music (Richard Rodgers), fashion (Yves Saint Laurent, Elsa Schiaparelli, Diana Vreeland, Carolina Herrera), art (Cecil Beaton, Pablo Picasso), interior decoration (Dorothy Draper, Billy Baldwin, David Hicks, Mario Buatta), socialites (the Rothschilds, Betsy Bloomingdale), royalty (The Duchess of Windsor), politics (the Reagans), to name but a few, and more recently influential people such as Bruce Weber and the Reed-Krakoffs.

Back in New York, the unstoppable artist – a true gentleman with whom I have had enjoyable conversations on Instagram – can be found every day at his drawing board in his Upper East side apartment working on private commissions but also on commercial assignments for advertisements, catalogues and artworks. His work is in the permanent collections of both the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.



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Bust in bronze of Jeremiah by Richard Frazier, 1953



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His stylish and studied renderings have been published in some of the most distinguished publications such as Harper’s BazaarHouse & GardenVogue, Vanity Fair magazines, The New York Times and Interior Design magazine whose covers he illustrated every month for 15 years from 1949 until 1964. He received in 1987 the prestigious Hall of Fame Award in recognition for his contribution in the field of Interior Design. Throughout his career, Jeremiah also embarked on numerous furniture design and product design projects such as fabrics and wallpapers.

A-Gent of Style adores the enchanting, moody atmosphere and unique air of mysticism that emanate from Goodman’s plates of artwork. There is a great sense of emotions, drama and ephemera in each of his watercolours but also depth and movement despite the static nature of this medium. One can’t but admire the way he captures light and shadow, and infuse rooms with warmth and personality, consequently giving them vitality and life.



Jeremiah’s prolific body of work throughout the decades:

Tony Duquette's living room

Tony Duquette’s living room



Greta Garbo's sitting-room

Greta Garbo’s sitting room





David Hicks's living room

David Hicks’s living room

 

 

Diana Vreeland's 'Garden in Hell' sitting room

Diana Vreeland’s ‘Garden in Hell’ sitting room

 

 

The Board room of the Vie-a-Merez, Florida

The Board Room at the Vie-a-Merez, Florida

 




Little Chalfield, the family home of William Bankier Henderson

Little Chalfield, the family home of William Bankier Henderson

 

 

 





Elsa Perretti's bedroom

Elsa Perretti’s bedroom



 

Edward Robinsons's living room by Frances Ekins

Edward Robinsons’s living room by Frances Ekins

 

 

Edward Albee's loft

Edward Albee’s loft

 

 

Sir John Gielgud's sitting room

Sir John Gielgud’s sitting room

 

 

Tony Duquette's oriental garden

Tony Duquette’s oriental garden

 

 




Leonard Stanley's bedroom

Leonard Stanley’s bedroom

 

Cecil Beaton's garden room

Cecil Beaton’s garden room

 

 

Dorothy and Richard Rogers's living room

Dorothy and Richard Rogers’s living room

 




 

Betsy Bloomingdale's living room

Betsy Bloomingdale’s living room

 

 

The Bedroom of Madame 'X'

The Bedroom of Madame ‘X’

 

 



 

Bruce Weber's living room

Bruce Weber’s living room

 

 

Mr and Mrs Dan Melnick's living room

Mr and Mrs Dan Melnick’s living room

 

 




 

Jeremiah Goodman's Goya-inspired bedroom

Jeremiah Goodman’s Goya-inspired bedroom

 



Cecil Beaton's sun room

Cecil Beaton’s sun room

 

 

French Riviera

French Riviera

 

 

Reed-Krakoff's living room

Reed-Krakoff’s living room

 









Carolina Herrera's sitting room

Carolina Herrera’s sitting room




Baron and Baroness de Rothschild's living room, Chateau de Mouton

Baron and Baroness de Rothschild’s living room, Chateau de Mouton

 

 

Colonel and Lady Jenner's bedroom

Colonel and Lady Jenner’s bedroom



 

 



Jeremyah Goodman's living room

Jeremiah’s living room

Duchess of Windor's country bedroom

Duchess of Windor’s country bedroom

 


 

Jeremiah’s living room

 



 

Betsy Bloomingdale's living room

Betsy Bloomingdale’s living room

 

 

 

 

 

NYC 's Lincoln Centre

NYC ‘s Lincoln Centre



 

Seattle World's Fair

Seattle World’s Fair, 1961

 

 

Seattle World's Fair, 1961

Seattle World’s Fair, 1961

 

 

Armani perfume promotion

Armani perfume promotion

 

 

Stock Exchange, Melbourne

Stock Exchange, Melbourne

 










 

 

 

 

PAD LONDON 2016



 

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PAD turned 1o this year. The latest instalment of PAD London on Berkeley Square just closed its doors and left many of us, antiques and design lovers, inspired and enraptured once again with this annual rendez-vous of first-class furniture, decorative objets, jewellery, photography, tribal and modern art represented by 65-odd world-class exhibitors.

The variety and stylistic combinations of the vignettes and their ‘eclectibles’ created beautiful relationships and synergies between seemingly disparate notables that read like a roll call of 20th C museum-quality pieces all commanding incredible provenance, rarity, authenticity and integrity.

Here are A-Gent of Style’s highlights of this year’s fair, for your eyes only…

 


– FUMI Gallery –

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– Jacques Lacoste – 

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  • Chahan –

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    – Galerie Dutko –

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    – Clara Scremini Gallery –

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    – David Gill Gallery –

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    – Rose Uniacke –

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    – Galerie Alain Marcelpoil – 

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    – Gallery Matthieu Richard –

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    – Didier Luttenbacher –

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    – Carpenters Workshop Gallery –

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    – De Jonckheere – 

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    – Galerie Jacques Lacoste –

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    – Galerie du Passage Pierre Passebon –

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    – Cabinet Albert Pinto –

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    -Phoenix Ancient Art SA – 

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    – Galerie Kreo –

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    – Galerie Chastel-Marechal –

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    – Magen H –

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    – Sarah Myerscough Gallery –

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    – Hamilton Gallery –

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    – Mazzoleni –

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    – Galerie Dumonteil –

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    – Entreprise Jousse –

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    – Herve Van der Straten –

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– JAMES –

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– Leclaireur –

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– Rose Uniacke –

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  • – The Restaurant by Veere Grenney Associates –

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    – All photographs by A-Gent of Style –




MUSEE DES ARTS DECORATIFS: a PIERRE FREY RETROSPECTIVE and a WALLPAPER TRIBUTE in PARIS





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Fresh from the enthralling whirlwind of events surrounding this January instalment of the Paris Déco Off – for which A-Gent of Style was a jury member – and all its peripheral launches, openings and bashes, A-Gent of Style will particularly remember the private event last week of the jaw-dropping Pierre Frey exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs as well as the Museum’s own tribute to 400 years of its own archive wallpapers. If you missed out on all the fun last week, A-Gent of Style would urge any wall hanging enthusiast to jump on a Eurostar this spring even for the day.


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The first major tribute ever paid to this major figure in interior decoration, Tissus Inspirés takes us chronologically through eighty years of creation, highlighting the skills and knowledge defining the Pierre Frey spirit and vision. The presentation of fabrics and wallpapers is complemented by works from the museum’s permanent collections and creations by contemporary artists brought together specially for the occasion and showing the considerable impact that Pierre Frey has made on current artistic practices. Celebrating this unique company’s history and identity, this exhibition takes visitors behind the scenes of a furnishing fabrics and wallpaper publishing house to reveal its sources of inspiration and production methods.

 

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This exhibition features the finest creations produced by Maison Pierre Frey since 1935. In the Study Gallery’s six rooms, it brings together some two hundred works from the creator’s collection illustrating the eclecticism and artistic collaborations that have characterized its history. Born in 1903, Pierre Frey started out in the furnishing fabrics world at the age of seventeen as a cutter for Maison Burger. He later became director of Maison Lauer, where he met the designer Jean Chatanay, with whom he created their own company. In 1937, he bought his partner’s shares in the firm and founded Maison Pierre Frey at 47 rue des Petits-Champs, where the company’s registered office still is today. The production values he established have remained unchanged thanks to his three grandchildren and his son, Patrick Frey, in charge of the company since 1975.

 

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The first room shows the stages and techniques involved in creating and producing a textile and the fabric publisher’s profession. Every Pierre Frey creation is a close collaboration between designer, weaver and printer, all of whose commitment is vital in achieving the company’s high quality standards. From the sketch to the finished product, the wealth of patterns, colours and materials of the pieces on display explore the creator’s stylistic identity. In the next rooms emblematic Pierre Frey textiles and wallpapers are presented alongside works from the Musée des Arts décoratifs. Their association emphasises the historical and artistic contexts in which they were created and evokes the tastes and tendencies of former times.

This historic approach to Pierre Frey’s work is revisited by a contemporary vision emphasising its modernity and topicality: four capsule collections by contemporary designers paying tribute to Pierre Frey. In the space covering the period from 1935 to 1959, Julien Colombier has created a printed fabric whose vivid colours react differently to ultraviolet light, creating a changing perception of the material in function of the lighting. In counterpoint to Pierre Frey creations from 1960-1979, Benjamin Graindorge’s wallpaper explores the problems of visual perception using the pixel as basic unit in spirit of the Op Art artists of the early 1970s. Marcel Wanders revisits Pierre Frey productions from 1980 to 1999 by reinterpreting the ever-present theme of the flower, and Nao Tamura, reflecting on Pierre Frey fabrics from 2000 to 2015, draws on her own universe to create a Jaquard Loom fabric, produced by the Pierre Frey factory in northern France, in which nature is omnipresent. The exhibition ends with a homage to Pierre Frey by seven artists of different nationalities working in different fields. They were asked to reflect on key Pierre Frey concepts: colour, ink, history, texture, pattern and the rustling of the fabric. Julien Salaud, Peter Gentenaar, Michelle Taylor-Dorset, Paule Riché, Kumi Yamashita, Memo Akten and Label Dalbin pay tribute to and metamorphose Maison Pierre Frey’s creative combination of tradition and modernity and project it into the future.



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And one floor up from the Pierre Frey exhibition, you will find the museum’s tantalising collection of wallpapers covering four centuries.


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Revealing the wealth of the Wallpaper Department’s exceptional collection, Faire le Mur features three hundred emblematic pieces selected from the reserve collection of more than 400,000 items. The exhibition juxtaposes and compares wallpapers from different periods and origins to illustrate the broad range of styles and skills in use from the 18th century to the present day. It shows wallpaper’s major role in the history of the decorative arts, whilst highlighting some of the jewels of the largest wallpaper collection in the world.



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