GABRIELLA CRESPI, TIMELESS by PIASA





Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.56.49

A-Gent of Style has written on the blog a couple of special features about his love affair for Gabriella Crespi, extolling the talents of the famous Milanese designer, artist and sculptress.


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.29.07


In two weeks’ time, a rare and seminal event will take place in Paris for any collector and admirer of Gabriella Crespi. French auction house PIASA is offering the auction GABRIELLA CRESPI, Timeless with a selection of the most important pieces created by the designer, artist, socialite & fashion muse who has left an indelible mark on 20th century Italian design with her inimitable taste Italian high-end design.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.23.54

– Auction –

November 26, 2014 – 6pm

PIASA, 118 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, 75008 Paris

– Viewing –

November 21, from 10am to 7pm November 22, from 11am to 7pm November 24, from 11am to 7pm November 25, from 10am to 7pm November 26, from 10am to 1pm

You can view the full catalogue here

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.57.05


All of Crespi’s designs place as much importance on aesthetics as on functionality, or even multi-functionality: coffee-tables are raised in height, bookcases are transformed into partitions, chairs turn into beds. A fine example is provided by her ingenious, twin-opening Mr-Mme commode (€20,000-30,000). Other sale highlights include a bamboo and brass Fungo lamp from her Rising Sun series (est. €5,000-7,000), and her 1976  Tavolo Scultura coffee table (est. €20,000-30,000).


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.37.15

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.37.26

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.38.19



She was born in 1922 and grew up in Tuscany, near Florence, before studying architecture at the Politecnico in Milan, where she discovered Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright. She married into one of Italy’s wealthiest families, who owned the Corriere della Sera and a textiles empire. From Rome and Milan she hired the finest craftsmen to produce her designs. Most of her works were produced in limited editions and have been rare and highly sought-after since the 1970s – and are all the more so today. Her designs are rare and were mostly the result of special commissions. Several leading personalities were passionately enthusiastic about her work, including Elizabeth Arden, Thomas Hoving (former head of New York’s Metropolitan Museum), Greek shipping magnate Georges Livanos, Princess Grace, Gunther Sachs and the Shah of Iran.


Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.24.19

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.34.57

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.29.00

Gabriella Crespi has always conveyed an art de vivre in tune with her times, full of freedom and pioneering ‘bohemian-chic’: a mix of 1970s aspiration and Italian tradition.

Although her style goes perfectly with materials like wood, bamboo, mirror and plexiglas, Gabriella Crespi’s most characteristic designs are in metal – notably brass. The convertible, three-part dining-table, from her celebrated Yang Yin series designed in 1979, is a perfect blend of brass and lacquered wood (est. €20,000-30,000).



Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.57.53

 Other sale highlights include a bamboo and brass Fungo lamp from her Rising Sun series (est. €5,000-7,000), and her 1976 Tavolo Scultura coffee table (est. €20,000-30,000). Crespi also designed a collection of sculpted animals in the purest tradition of de luxe Italian metalwork, embellished with eggs made from Murano glass or, in the case of her elegant, hand-chased silver plated Ostrich, with a veritable ostrich egg (est. €2,500-3,000).



Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.57.18


Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.25.22


At the height of her fame, Crespi had two showrooms, one on Milan’s Via Montenapoleone, and the second one in the former Palazzo Cenci in Rome, where her furniture was set off against spectacular frescoes of Umbrian landscapes. But, in 1987, she decided to close her company and devote herself to spirituality: she would continue to spend several months each year in the most remote regions of India into her eighties. Back in Italy Gabriella Crespi remains a respected fount of inspiration, and Milan paid tribute to her with the exhibition Il Segno e lo Spirito at the Palazzo Reale in 2011: a journey through the languages of contemporary expression via Gabriella Crespi’s work and artistic output.

To mark the Gabriella Crespi sale, PIASA will be publishing Timeless – a monograph of her work by Anne Bony, authoress of numerous books on Design, retracing the career of the Italian Designer and, over and beyond her career, outlining her inspiration, spirit and style. Books published alongside major themed sales by PIASA Editions will offer a powerful record of 20th and 21st century creativity.


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.28.50


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.35.27


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.35.19


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.35.41

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.18.56

Screen Shot 2015-03-25 at 17.47.39

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.35.53


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.35.06


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.36.23


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.36.49


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.38.29



Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.38.46


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.39.18


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.36.34

Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.57.37


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.37.32


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.37.58


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.38.04


Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.23.32


Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.24.07


Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.24.26


Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.25.34


Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.24.46


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.37.05


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.40.52


Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.36.00

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.18.51

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 09.36.56



– Imagery from the Gabriella Crespi archives and PIASA – 





A LONDONER IN TANGIER: THE REGIS MILCENT ATELIER





img_8207


Not far from the Mohammed V mosque and within walking distance from his apartment, A-Gent of Style made a great and discovery one afternoon in Tangier this summer as he was strolling back home nonchalantly in the Moroccan heat. By pure happenstance, he came across the boutique-cum-atelier of Régis Milcent, the late, famed French decorator, incongruously situated amongst residential modern blocks of flats, convenience stores, ice cream parlours and cafés.



img_8285



This eponymous atelier is a magical, and unexpected, treasure trove of wonderfully eclectic objets for the home, a cornucopia of selected, unusual antiques amassed and curated over a lifetime from different corners of the world by Régis Milcent, who died a few years ago (it has proved impossible so far to find any information about the decorator perhaps only because the discreet Milcent built his reputation through word of mouth and not publications), mixing European sensibilities with exotic rarities that only a discerning eye or an aesthete would appreciate. It is very similar, in a way, to the Sybil Colefax and John Fowler store at Brook Street, albeit much smaller and in Tangier, in the sense that each area has been curated as a vignette representing a sitting room, a living room or a study for instance. One-off paintings, furniture and rugs brush shoulders with lamps, dishes, ceramics, vases and many other pieces, all beautiful in their own right, and with an incredible collection of original Pierre Frey fabrics that A-Gent of Style was thrilled to discover for the first time; some of them adorn the furniture and walls in the store.

Régis Milcent is not only a shop but mainly a decorative and upholstery company situated at the back of the store, behind the ‘1001 finds’ on display, now run by two delightful men (A-Gent of Style met them only briefly) who worked for many years for Milcent, where they and their team cater for local businesses but also for some of the established international decorators who holiday or have settled in the Tangerine city. Who could blame them. What else do you need!


img_8298

img_8296


img_8295

img_8271

img_8273

img_8288

img_8272

img_8274

img_8292

img_8289

img_8214

img_8218

img_8215

img_8216

img_8217

img_8219

img_8212

img_8287

img_8275

 

img_8284


img_8286

img_8276


img_8208

img_8282

img_8277

img_8290


img_8280

img_8281.jpg


img_8279

img_8294


img_8293


img_8211

img_8283




 

 

A LONDONER IN TANGIER: THE AMERICAN LEGATION



 

img_8410


img_8387

One of the recommendations A-Gent of Style was given before his trip to Tangier last month was to visit The American Legation, the first American public property outside of the United States. And he is glad he made it as it has become not only one of the most historic places to visit in Tangier but also an enticing cluster of elegant houses nestled around a charming, lush courtyard, all of which bursting with Moorish decorative marvels, refined decor of European and Federalist sensitivity, and a notable collection of paintings.

Located within the fortified city’s labyrinthine Medina, the American Legation is an elegant and elaborate five-storied building with its original two-story mud, stoned and white stuccoed masonry designed in the Moorish-style. It commemorates the historic cultural and diplomatic relations between the United States and the Kingdom of Morocco as Morocco was the first country to recognize the United States, in December 1777.

 President George Washington established the first diplomatic mission to Morocco in December 1797 when an American Consulate was established in Tangier with the hope of ensuring the safe passage of American shipping into the Mediterranean. In 1821, the Moroccan ruler, Sid Suleiman, gave the United States, a building in the old medina of Tangier, now the American Legation. It is now officially called the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies, and is a cultural centre, museum, and a research library, concentrating on Arabic language studies.


img_8381

img_8384

 

The Legation housed the United States Legation and Consulate for 140 years, the longest period any building abroad has been occupied as a United States diplomatic post. It is symbolic of the 1786 Moroccan–American Treaty of Friendship, which is still in force today. The complex expanded over the years as the surrounding houses were bought up. During World War II, it served as headquarters for United States intelligence agents. In 1976 a group of American citizens established a public, non-profit organization to save the Old American Legation (as it is known locally). Today, the Tangier American Legation Museum Society rents the structure, which is still owned by the United States Government. You can read a brief history here from the official website.

The American Legation boasts many paintings by Marguerite McBey (her husband James McBey’s painting Zohra is quite tantalising – it is known as the Moroccan Mona Lisa as the sitter’s eyes can follow you from whatever angle you gaze at the portrait) and other artists, and also includes an entire wing devoted to the most notorious expatriate of Tangier, writer and composer Paul Bowles, thanks to many private donations of books, furnishings, recordings, photographs and other memorabilia (letters, music scores).

An altogether fascinating world A-Gent of Style was delighted to delve into.
As will you!



img_8408


img_8392

img_8390

img_8389

img_8436

img_8393

img_8394

dutch_map_straits_of_gibraltar_18c


img_8395

img_8397

img_8399

img_8396

img_8405

photo


6a00e54f782d838833017743ae146a970d-500wi

08_talim_balcony_hallway

img_8400

img_8402


img_8401

img_8404

img_8430

img_8431

img_8437

img_8438

img_8403


21_talim_sitting_room

07_talim_balcony

17_TALIM_reception_room2


img_8409


img_8407

img_8411

img_8412

img_8413

img_8415

img_8419

15_talim_patio_tile

img_8418

img_8416

img_8421

img_8428


img_8429

img_8422

img_8423

img_8424

img_8426

img_8420

img_8432

img_8433

img_8434

img_8435

10_TALIM_crossing_over_alley2


img_8385


02_rue_dAmerique_street_sign



– Photos by A-Gent of Style – 







Page 5 of 26« First...34567...1020...Last »
© Copyright agentofstyle - Designed by Dentdelion