“A LONDONER IN PARIS”: HICKS-TATIC





…and ecstatic, two very good words to describe the day A-Gent of Style experienced last week in Paris.

As I was wandering through the streets of Saint-Sulpice with my friend’s dog Ben,
I turned a corner into Rue de Tournon, a few steps from our apartment and
Les Jardins du Luxembourg. Unbeknownst to me, I stumbled upon a shop (at number 12) which subtle and discreet name letters on the wall made me go back on my steps and realise that this wasn’t any shop. It was the David Hicks France shop. And nothing or noone had prepared me for this.



Now when you are an interior designer, David Hicks’ name resonates with many things. The late illustrious English interior decorator has been one of my decorating heroes for some time now and his legacy and reputation are second to none. His influence has also had an impact on many accomplished designers over the past decades. I know for instance my previous boss Veere Grenney is an avid admirer – he now owns Hicks’ stunning 18th C Palladian folly ‘The Temple’ in the country.

As I stepped into the shop, I felt as if my senses had been ‘assaulted’. Suddenly, I was enveloped in an hallucinatory ‘Hicks-esque’ microcosm, a kaleidoscope of vibrant, garish, saturated colours, patterns and textures, a pumped-up universe of kitsch and sophistication.

And if you are an admirer of, say, only 18th C heavily-gilded Rococo, Bierdermeier, Jean Prouvé or any form of minimalism, avert your eyes now!




This boutique was created in 1973, opposite the original Saint Laurent Rive Gauche boutique (that A-Gent of style featured in All About Yves), to offer the sophisticated Parisian circles the groovy Hicks look that enraptured London in the 1970s. It is now the only Hicks shop remaining in the world. Why can’t we have one in London?? Next time you are in Paris, make sure you pay it a visit. It’s heaven!

Since its opening, David Hicks France has offered a plethora of products from the David Hicks archives and brand – furniture, lighting, wallpapers, fabrics – thanks to the passion and genius of current creative director Christophe d’Aboville and manager Marie-Dominique Cunaud who have tirelessly promoted the look and the name and re-interpreted Hicks’ rich design heritage for the last decade or so.


It was so exciting to share my passion with the delightful Marie-Dominique who could not have been any more welcoming or nice. She even took me to their next door art gallery where they exhibit contemporary pieces of art in a ‘Hicks-esque’ setting.



David Hicks
(1929-1998) was a complete decorating maverick who revolutionised interior decoration back in the 1960s and 1970s and his vision was truly unique. Back in the day, his interiors must have looked ever so daring, unusual, radical and ultimately modern. I think he particularly excelled at mixing antiques furniture with his now iconic layers of clashing colours, highly geometric patterns, contrasting textures and his extravagance, sophistication and intelligence.



Here is a selection of David Hicks legendary and carefully arranged interiors with his compositions of objects and artworks, or “tablescapes” as he liked to call them:



“Often imitated, never duplicated”

Some of Hicks’ iconic graphics and their modern re-interpretations:



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And finally, if you want to know more about the decorating legend, I can’t recommend enough this fantastic book by his son Ashley Hicks:




Some treasurable oldies:





2 comments


  • my darling, not only you are a FABulous interior designer but where do you get your writing from??? I am F(L)ABbergasted and in awe.
    you will never stop to impress me Fab!!

    May 19, 2013
  • wonderful рost, very informative. I’m wondering why the other specialists
    of this sector don’t realize this. You must ρroceed
    your writing. I’m confident, you have a great readers’ base already!

    November 6, 2016

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